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Before marking this post duplicate or voting to get it closed (the reason for which I simply don't get just because it is a grammar forum after all! If I am seeking recommendation for a book that means I will be coming back someday to the same site for my doubts also provided I get a not so harsh reply!), please read this and help this MBA aspirant.

A little about myself and my research so far. I am a very critical reader of English Grammar and the kind of person who aims at perfection. Currently, I am keen on taking on English grammar again after a certain gap. Well, I am aiming for MBA, so preparing for entrance exams for the same. I bought the religiously followed Wren and Martin and started studying it chapter by chapter. I was surprised when I read the pronouns chapter. I studied all the rules given and then started practising but it came as surprise when I found when many of the attempted questions were wrong. The reason simply being the rules for those specific sentences were not given.

For example:

We scored as many goals as they/them?

According to me, the answer should be they, but it's them according to the solution manual. Worse still, the solution manual offers no explanation for this.

So after a chat with my teachers I was suggested to follow the blogs of grammarians and look for any rules for the sentences that have contradictory answers!

I did so and was clarified by this post of pronouns, Rule 5.

Then I saw a book by the same author. I was momentarily happy. It was Momentarily because the reviews on Amazon were too bad about this book. After reading a couple of forums about the book I found a common statement saying that no grammar book is exhaustive.

So, it's okay for me to have more than one. And my simple question is what will be a good and almost exhaustive (if not fully exhaustive) book of English grammar to help get through the subtle usages of English in my management entrances which is crisp and to the point and yet covers all important rules and syntax, and most importantly having practice tests at the end with solutions and explanations?

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closed as off-topic by Andrew Leach, MrHen, Kristina Lopez, tchrist, mgkrebbs Jan 25 at 6:40

  • This question does not appear to be about English language and usage within the scope defined in the help center.
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You may find What good reference works on English are available online? and What are your favorite English language tools? helpful. Please note that this is not a "grammar forum"; it is not a forum at all. Our sister site at English Language Learners may be a good resource for you as well. –  choster Jan 23 at 17:46
    
@choster Sir,please ignore my specific terms like forum as i said earlier. I don't know then what i should call it. But anyway the comment you posted only suggests an exhaustive set of english resources . I am not looking for dictionaries and good reads but just GRAMMAR books. And meanwhile i am posting to the ell.stackexchange.com too if you don't like it here ! –  user63166 Jan 23 at 17:54
    
You're right, finding exhaustive sources is tough. I think good starts are Garner's Modern American Usage, English Grammar in Use, and maybe a style guide, like the Chicago Manual of Style. If those seem useful I can post more as an answer. Best of luck on your MBA. –  jboneca Jan 23 at 18:26
    
One of the reasons Stack Exchange doesn't like this sort of recommendation question is that they date easily. What might be a good answer today could be rendered obsolete tomorrow if the recommended book goes out of print, or a better one is published. It's also hugely subjective. [Admittedly, @Reg's CGEL is unlikely to go out of print, or be bettered!] –  Andrew Leach Jan 23 at 18:40
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This question appears to be off-topic because it is not about a subject listed as on-topic and every potential answer is equally valid. –  Andrew Leach Jan 23 at 18:57

1 Answer 1

Get yourself a copy of The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language. It's very expensive. It's very thick. It's also excellent. And if it's not exhaustive, then exhaustive has no meaning. It will be quick to point out that your "Rule 5 on this post of pronouns" is oversimplified to put it mildly, and stuff and nonsense to be frank, and it will tell you why.

If you can't afford CGEL to look up a particular intricacy of the language, you can always just ask about it here. That's what this site is all about, you know.

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Yes sir, it's too expensive and i will definitely look forward to ask any such nuances and subtleties here only . But was just looking for a quick reference for such common and nascent questions of mine. –  user63166 Jan 23 at 18:55
    
But please bear in mind whether you will require a guide for British or American English - or any other variant. I don't have good examples for you at present, but this can make a huge difference as to whether your usage is considered correct/natural/consistent. –  nxx Jan 23 at 21:41

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