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In an email, I would like to write the following sentence:

The weight of services given by Company B is not less than the weight of services given by Company A.

I want to contract this sentence, but I'm not sure if this is correct:

The weight of services given by Company B is not less than Company A.

What are my options for explaining this with just one sentence?

To make the context more clear: Company A and Company B are two partner firms in the same sector sharing the revenues according to specific conditions. They can merge or split in the near future. The aim of this sentence is to emphasize that the service quantity of Company B is larger than or (at worst) equal to the service quantity of Company A.

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Are you talking about literal weight in this sentence? I can't tell without more context, but the phrase "weight of services" might be awkward-sounding English if you mean something like "breadth of services". –  michaelmichael Mar 2 '11 at 15:26
    
@michaelmichael: Please see my edit. –  Mehper C. Palavuzlar Mar 2 '11 at 16:29
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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I like Jimi Oke's shortest suggestion, but I will also add one further minor tweak:

The weight of services given by Company B is no less than that of Company A.

"No less than" is a better idiom for expressing "at least equal to".

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+1: Great suggestion. –  Jimi Oke Mar 3 '11 at 1:37
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Options for contraction:

  • The weight of services given by Company B is not less than that of Company A.
  • The weight of services given by Company B is not less than that of those given by Company A.
  • The weight of services given by Company B is not less than the weight of those given by Company A.

A couple suggestions that could do the job just as well, or better:

  • Company B offers just as many services as [does] Company A.
  • Company B offers just as substantial a range of services as [does] Company A.
  • The range of services offered by Company B is as broad/substantial as that of Company A.
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Your proposal is OK, but to lessen the (remote) possibility of someone taking it to mean that "Company A weighs as much as the services," you could say:

The weight of services given by Company B is not less than that of Company A.

I am guessing, but by not saying company B has MORE weight than A, I assume then that they are the same. In that case:

The weight of services given by both companies is comparable.

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It is perfectly grammatical. If you think it isn't please do explain why to the original poster. –  horatio Mar 2 '11 at 17:04
    
So correct grammar, but possible misinterpretation of meaning: the opposite of what you wrote and exactly what I wrote. –  horatio Mar 2 '11 at 17:25
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That is a new definition of the word "grammar." Grammar is about structure and form, not meaning or intention. –  horatio Mar 2 '11 at 17:32
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You are still conflating intention with grammaticality. It is a ridiculous assertion that an utterance which failed to convey the intended meaning is ungrammatical. (missed your most recent comment) –  horatio Mar 2 '11 at 17:49
    
And yet the first sentence is grammatical. –  horatio Mar 9 '11 at 15:01
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Strange phrase "weight of services" does 'weight' imply weakness (as in burden) or strength?

How about "Company A's services outweigh Company B's"?

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