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A slang word which means someone addicted to playing video or computer games.
A gameholic?

It can't be nerd or geek because those expressions denote the person may indeed be eccentric, a loner, and obsessive but nevertheless possess a certain expertise in the field of technology and/or a passion for things hi-tech in general.

I would like a word for someone who continually plays online or computer games until the small hours. I was thinking of midnight gamer or RPG fanatic, but obviously they're not idiomatic. Wikipedia's Role Playing Game terms didn't prove to be very helpful.

And I would also like to know if an equivalent term for a middle-aged man or woman exists, for example a house-wife who has only recently caught the computer-playing bug because her own children play video games.

I did look at this question and although I quite like the term, mouse potato, and it's fairly accurate, it doesn't quite convey the obsessive and compulsive element I had in mind.

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Alas, if only The Onion was real! Because then a viable candidate might be World of World of Warcrafter. –  J.R. Jan 19 at 17:29
    
I love it! You'd think by now a term would have been coined. I had one Italian student who wrote: "He is like an "informatic boy": he loves playing video games every day" I mean, nerd and geek doesn't really work, does it? –  Mari-Lou A Jan 19 at 17:37
    
Like it or not, entertainment, as everything else, is largely becoming something that happens sitting at a computer screen. I have just been watching my eight-year-old grandson doing his homework, much of which he does on-line. He earns points with correct answers to maths questions, which he can use for purchasing clothing and icons to build his own avatar. He and his friends display their avatars for everyone to see. To get more points he has to do some more maths tests. Increasingly we are reading ebooks. The rectangular screen is increasingly dominating our lives. –  WS2 Jan 19 at 22:24
    
He does his maths homework online, as a multiple choice quiz? And he can build his avatar etc.? I'm flabbergasted. There is NOTHING similar to this in the Italian primary or middle schools in the city where I live. Schools still have blackboards, although interactive boards are becoming increasingly used and popular, but you won't have one in every classroom. It's considered a bit of a luxury. –  Mari-Lou A Jan 19 at 22:30
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@J.R. I didn't interpret WS2 words as complaining, but rather as his stating a fact, an inescapable truth. –  Mari-Lou A Jan 19 at 23:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Perhaps hardcore gamer

Someone who plays video games as a primary hobby. They tend to spend large amounts of time playing games, often in excess of two or three hours a day.

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Hardcore gamer I like. Thanks. –  Mari-Lou A Jan 19 at 18:00

Video-junkie, game-junkie, gamer-junkie? It's not an original idea on my part See this.

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I've just watched the short documentary, at first I thought it was an excuse by the Chinese authorities to ban or severely limit teenagers access to the Internet. Instead, the therapist at the centre of rehabilitation actually talked a lot of sense; the idea that someone, physically healthy, prefers to wear diapers rather than waste time going to the restroom, is frightening. Interesting clip, thank you. –  Mari-Lou A Jan 21 at 1:17

I think that you are essentially looking for gamer. The word already implies the kind of obsession dedication you describe. You wouldn't use gamer to describe someone who played a game every now and again, it's used for people who play a lot. The definitions of the urban dictionary might help (a little).

If you want to be more extreme, you could go for variants like hardcore gamer or passionate gamer etc.

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Any light on middle-aged people who discover online games. Would noobies fit? –  Mari-Lou A Jan 19 at 18:02
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@Mari-LouA no, noobie and its variants imply ignorance as well as novelty. Someone who already knows how to play the game won't be a newbie and someone can be a newbie at any age. You could coin mid-life crisis gamer :). –  terdon Jan 19 at 18:05
    
Ooh, that's a bit too wordy but it's very nice. Thank you! –  Mari-Lou A Jan 19 at 18:08

I have heard many of these types referred to as 'Cave Dwellers'.

cave-dweller, noun: a person who spends a majority of their time on a computer.

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Could you perhaps provide a link or any reference? I quite like the term, but if I am to suggest this expression to Italian friends and students, I'd like to be sure. Thanks. –  Mari-Lou A May 7 at 20:56
    
Excellent! It would be great if you could edit the link in your answer. Thank you so much! –  Mari-Lou A May 7 at 21:09

For the obsessed middle-aged player you might have to make something up; how about "boombanger"?

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Someone who bangs booms? I assume you're somehow referring to the baby boomers but how does banging enter into it? –  terdon Jan 19 at 18:39
    
Banger is a sexual term meaning someone who is obsessed with sex. In this context it's not a perfect fit, but it still implies someone who is focused on winning, which is what games are about. –  bluestone Jan 19 at 19:03

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