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When is it okay to end a sentence in a preposition?

Does this sentence make sense "I would like to propose forming a partnership where we work together to provide optimal service to the new developments you are building, or have already started construction on."

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grammar is the least of that sentence's worries. –  tenfour Mar 1 '11 at 16:32
    
Oops, @RegDwight and I were typing at the same time and I didn't see his comment. Also voting to close as a duplicate. –  Robusto Mar 1 '11 at 16:57
    
Obligatory Wayne's word: Party on! –  Mr. Shiny and New 安宇 Mar 1 '11 at 17:57
    
I'd like to propose a partnership in which we do not work together, but rather one partner is a special slave to the other (the only kind of unequal but productive partnership I can think of at the moment). We provide less-than-optimal service; and upon deliberation we have decided to provide it to new developments of yours, though not to those you are building or constructing, but rather to those that you are not actively engaged in. I felt it was necessary to present the only possible alternative to what you probably expected, my dear client. [/sorry-couldn't-resist] –  Cerberus Mar 1 '11 at 20:24
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marked as duplicate by RegDwigнt, Robusto, JSBձոգչ, Kosmonaut Mar 2 '11 at 3:01

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3 Answers

Sounds like stilted corporate speech but if it is, it parses and can be understood.

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You're putting me on. Of course you can end a sentence with "on". It is a construction I rely on.

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Don't you mean that it is a construction on which you rely? ;) –  Shaun Mar 1 '11 at 16:47
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@Shaun: In spite of that, I see you did continue on. –  Robusto Mar 1 '11 at 17:04
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One must never end a sentence with a preposition -- if there are grammar-school English teachers around. It is, to borrow a phrase, the sort of nonsense up with which they shall not put. –  bye Mar 1 '11 at 17:12
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@Stan Rogers: Um, er ... me on you are putting? You on me are putting? You are me on putting? I'm trying. I really am. –  Robusto Mar 1 '11 at 17:29
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@Robusto: I am that on which you are putting. –  chaos Mar 1 '11 at 17:42
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To be grammatically correct with regard to use of prepositions, you should reword the phrase:

I would like to propose forming a partnership where we work together to provide optimal service to the new developments you are building, or those on which you have already started construction.

However, the last two phrases seem redundant. If they are building a development, it's understood they have started construction on it. As such, the end can be omitted:

I would like to propose forming a partnership where we work together to provide optimal service to the new developments you are building.

In addition, I would tweak it a bit further to make it flow better:

I would like to propose a partnership wherein we work together to provide optimal service to the new developments you are building.

It's understood that the partnership is between you and the other party if the goal is that you would be working together for a common goal.

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Thank you all for the comments. Some helpful, some entertaining and on and on.... –  user5600 Mar 1 '11 at 20:49
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