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(As a follow-up to the question,) Suppose there is a group of people, and suppose in this group opinions and ideas of a specific member of the group is always accepted by other members and they obey what he/she says. Is there an idiom/phrase for it?

[...] We had had a special respect for my father in my family and his opinions and ideas were always accepted by other family members and as they put it, [the requested idiom or phrase].

In my native language, we say:

He always says the last word.

(The child is the one I mentioned in my previous question)

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There are people who "always have to have the last word", but there's no implication that anyone accepts what they have to say. ("Having the last word" doesn't make someone right.) –  snailboat Dec 25 '13 at 12:49
    
In English, you usually have the last word in a discussion, rather than saying it. Quite apart from that, I’m a bit unsure what you’re really looking for here. Are you looking for a noun to replace ‘my father’ in this context, or are you looking for an expression like ‘has the last word’? –  Janus Bahs Jacquet Dec 25 '13 at 12:49
    
@JanusBahsJacquet: The latter. –  Gigili Dec 25 '13 at 12:51
    
@snailboat: You're right, they might be wrong but they still have the last word. –  Gigili Dec 25 '13 at 12:52
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There is the expression that someone has (or gets) the final say in something, but that mostly deals with specific decisions where someone has the authority to decide which of a set of options will be chosen. Is that close enough? –  Janus Bahs Jacquet Dec 25 '13 at 12:53

3 Answers 3

I would go with his word is final. That usually means that whatever that person said is how it is. For example, "you're going to school and that's final," means "you're going to school and the discussion is over." Likewise, "the chairman's word on the proposed interview process is final," meaning whatever he has to say about how the process is to be carried out is what everyone must adhere to.

Hope that helps.

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If you want to convey the idea of someone's who makes the final decision, whose word is respected and whose opinion is never disputed, consider the following options.

  • He who must be obeyed. Better known as she who must be obeyed. Its meaning is self explanatory and in the OP's context this phrase might be said in all seriousness or in a lighter, more humorous tone of voice.
  • He's the boss. Not exactly an idiom but it implies that you don't mess around with this person and whatever decision he makes is final. A related idiom is show somebody who's boss

We had had a special respect for my father in my family and his

opinions and ideas were always accepted by other family members and as they put it, he was the boss.

  • His word is law. There's no use questioning any of his rules - his word is law around here.

  • Say-so. Usually a permission or instruction to do something given by a figure of authority. Nothing happens without his say-so.

and as they put it, nothing was decided without his say-so

  • Have the final say. In many families, the mother has the last say on the children's education and activities.

...We had had a special respect for my father in my family and his opinions and ideas were always accepted by other family members and as they put it, he had the final say.

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We had had a special respect for my father in my family and his opinions and ideas were always accepted by other family members and, as they put it, he is the one who always has the last word.

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Surely it should be he was the one... here. –  TimLymington Dec 25 '13 at 23:29
    
@TimLymington I did think of that grammatical issue. However, I saw an overriding semantic issue and preferred the present. –  Kris Dec 26 '13 at 6:21

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