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marauder

This question honestly has nothing to do with hats, but I saw that there was a hat award called “Marauder”.

What is a marauder? Whilst I do have access to this site, I can’t find any dictionaries or etymology sites on the Internet.

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It's possible that marauding has something to do with peanuts, but that might be some kind of hat-induced delusion. –  KitFox Dec 17 '13 at 14:14
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I would check but I refuse to find an answer to the question myself. –  Ste Dec 17 '13 at 14:24
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Is this a duplicate of this? –  Hugo Dec 17 '13 at 14:26
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What, that he linked a totally random question? –  KitFox Dec 17 '13 at 14:36
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What the hat is going on here? –  cornbread ninja 麵包忍者 Dec 17 '13 at 16:21
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28 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A marauder is someone who jumps on a ship in order to get booty. Also, someone who jumps off a ship to move inland to get booty preferably from a bandwagon.

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Marauder is an anagram of A Dear Rum because he has expensive taste what with all the treasure.

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It is also an anagram of a rude ram. –  Robusto Dec 18 '13 at 21:58
    
I certainly hope his drinking habits are not the cause—otherwise, it is frighteningly illuminating that ‘marauder’ is also an anagram for urea dram. –  Janus Bahs Jacquet Dec 23 '13 at 14:56
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Google defines marauder as:

a person who marauds; a raider

Merriam-Webster defines it as the noun that corresponds to maraud defined as:

to roam about and raid in search of plunder

According to Wikipedia:

A person engaged in banditry or related activity

  • Looting

  • Outlaw

  • Partisan (military)

  • Robbery

  • Theft

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Harry Potter has a reference to "Marauder's map" in the 3rd book - Prizoner of Azkaban. I now understand what it literally means! –  Prahlad Yeri Dec 17 '13 at 19:01
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A marauder is a person who steals hats on the high seas.

Back in the 17th century, when pirating was at its height, hats were seen as very orderly, and so the more hats you had the more order you had attained, and so the better you were ("of a higher order").

People who became obsessed with hats were called "more orders", which took on the French spelling, hence marauder.

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+1 Oh, HELL yes. –  MετάEd Dec 17 '13 at 23:40
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A marauder is a kind of rodent that lives in the sea. From French "mer", sea, and English "otter".

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This may be favourite even though it is the most ridiculous! –  Ste Dec 17 '13 at 14:52
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I hardly think this is the most ridiculous answer here! –  Mr. Shiny and New 安宇 Dec 17 '13 at 14:54
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Does he live in a fruit? –  tylerharms Dec 17 '13 at 14:57
    
But pineapples don't have bilateral symmetry, @tylerharms. –  TRiG Dec 25 '13 at 6:03
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Marauder is a German demonym. Au(e), as you well know, is the German word for "floodplain". You'll easily remember Rheinau, Petersau and a dozen more. Likewise, Marau is the floodplain of the river Mar, which flows through Narjan-Mar and ends at the Mar dyke. The remaining der is of course the German definite masculine singular article. Marauder, thus, is "he of the folk in the floodplain of the river Mar".

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This is genius. –  KitFox Dec 17 '13 at 16:46
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Maraud is a rare verb, originally borrowed from French marauder. Collins defines it like this:

to wander or raid in search of plunder

Although this verb as such was never terribly common, I would suggest that it is now unlikely to be familiar to most speakers. Today we have instead two derived forms:

  • marauder, a noun ("one who wanders or raids in search of plunder")
  • marauding, a participial adjective ("wandering or raiding in search of plunder")

Using maraud as a verb is still possible, but if it's comprehensible to most speakers, I imagine it's by analogy to these derived forms. I don't expect most speakers to have a lexical entry for the verb maraud in their mental dictionaries.

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A marauder is “By extension anything which marauds”. The verb maraud has a nice entry in etymonline:

maraud (v.) 1690s, from French marauder (17c.), from Middle French maraud "rascal" (15c.), of unknown origin, perhaps from French dialectal maraud "tomcat," echoic of its cry. A word popularized in several languages during the Thirty Years War (cf. Spanish merodear, German marodiren "to maraud," marodebruder "straggler, deserter") by punning association with Count Mérode, imperialist general. Related: Marauded; marauding.

Edit: Erwin Brandstetter suggests that “The German verb is actually marodieren”. This is true now (1) but might not have been true before German spelling reforms of 1901. The etymonline entry quoted above closely follows text from OED1 (1908; vol. 6 part 2, p. 151):

Cf. Sp. merodear, to maraud, merode masc., act of marauding; also G. marodiren to maraud, marode adj., worn out with marching (said orig. of stragglers belonging to an army), marode fem., act of marauding, marodebruder, marodereiter straggler, deserter. The Fr. words were adopted in German in the 17th c., and were punningly associated with the name of Count Merode, an imperialist general in the Thirty Years’ War, whose troops were notorious for want of discipline.]

The OED1 maraud entry is curiously ambivalent about the meaning of the verb:

  1. To make a raid for the purpose of plundering. [...] b. To go about pilfering. 2. To plunder ; to harry.

OED1's marauder entry says:

One who roves in quest of plunder; a freebooter, plunderer.

It appears one need not do any actual plundering to be a marauder; it is enough merely to intend to plunder, to search for plunder, to pilfer and harrass, to straggle or desert.

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Enjoy your headwear! –  Ste Dec 23 '13 at 17:54
    
My high school called itself the "Marauders" and until now, I never knew its meaning. Then I went to another school that called themselves the "Hoyas" and I'm still trying to figure out that one. –  Bruce James Dec 23 '13 at 22:37
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The German verb is actually marodieren. It's a typo in your source. –  Erwin Brandstetter Dec 24 '13 at 3:05
    
@ErwinBrandstetter, etymonline appears to have gotten marodiren from 1908 OED1; see edit –  jwpat7 Dec 24 '13 at 6:24
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@ErwinBrandstetter, the etymonline maintainer (Doug Harper) has added marodieren to the maraud entry; it now reads, “...German marodiren, marodieren "to maraud,"...” Harper notes that a Google books search gave 3710 hits for marodieren and 4190 for marodiren, with "marodiren" generally older, and "marodieren" mostly after 1890s. –  jwpat7 Dec 26 '13 at 2:35
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A marauder is a type of military vehicle.

I refuse to provide any citations for this information.

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I believe this answer is the correct one, because I believe in you! –  KitFox Dec 17 '13 at 14:12
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And military vehicles are a type of hat! –  Matt Эллен Dec 17 '13 at 14:24
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Land-hats. Hats that the deserts wear. –  Ste Dec 17 '13 at 14:24
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You ascend it and then it ascends a small desert hut and then you are the hat of the hut. –  tylerharms Dec 17 '13 at 14:52
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I wish there were a Jabba the Hatt. –  cornbread ninja 麵包忍者 Dec 17 '13 at 16:18
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Marauder is a very offensive word to call someone, similar to ‘lout’, ‘knuckle-dragger’, or ‘oaf’. It implies an astute lack of intelligence, moral fibre, vim, stamina, and work ethic.

The original form in English was maredaur /məˈɹiːdɔːɹ/, from which the two last vowels metathesised (probably partly under pressure of the common /əɹ/ suffix denoting nomina agentis).

The word comes from the Irish marbhuigheadóir (modern spelling maraíodóir), the original meaning of which is:

marbhuigheadóir
One who followed the old type of plough trampling and beating back the sods as turned

– from the verb marbhuigh (modern spelling maraigh):

marbhuighim (= marbhaim)
I kill, slay, slaughter; oppress, injure severely; obsess, worry; deaden, neutralise, beat (a card), take kinks out of rope, etc.; give in mortmain

– applied specifically to tramping down or flattening a sod.

The shift from a person who tramps down sods after the plough has turned them to a useless, ignorant, lazy git is quite a simple and logical one, since these are natural traits found in anyone willing to waste his time on something so mind-bogglingly boring and useless as stomping on overturned sods all day. Claims that it (the semantic shift) was based on the idioticness of the hats traditionally worn by the marbhuigheadóirí have been found to be quite unfounded, as the marbhuigheadóirí did not wear hats at all: they just had really bad hair.

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Have a hat from me to you. –  Ste Dec 23 '13 at 15:42
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Marauder is a mistranslation of an earlier word "malauger". This was a drill with a curved bit that wobbled dangerously, and only a truly adept craftsman could wield it. Our current word maintains only the sense of "danger" of the original word. It has lost the meaning of "tool".

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Marauder is a colloquial expression used when checking on the status of items purchased:

I'm callin' t'check on ma'rauder. Ma'raseet says it should'a bin in t'day.

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A Marauder (comes from marauding) is something or someone who lurks around an objective, it marauds. Common marauders are carnivore animals hunting for prey.

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As a carnivore, I can attest to the truthfulness of this answer. lurks, marauds –  KitFox Dec 17 '13 at 14:19
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A maraudivore is quite distinct from a carnivore. –  Hugo Dec 17 '13 at 14:22
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I like maraudivores..... but I couldn't eat a whole one. –  Ste Dec 17 '13 at 14:26
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Even worse than maraudivores are maraudivorivores. –  Mr. Shiny and New 安宇 Dec 17 '13 at 14:31
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And velocimaraudivores? –  tylerharms Dec 17 '13 at 15:04
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Originally, it was "marauder, marauhier, marau everywhere" but it's changed over time.

Note that "hier" and "der" spellings is now different. Also, "Marau" was probably the name of a Greek god.

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As the illustration shows, a marauder is a kind of plaque used for mounting model cars and airplanes. The 1969 model by the Mercury Plaque Corporation is quite popular among collectors.

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A lot can be explained when we look into the words' histories.
Marauder was borrowed in English in the 17th century from French maraudeur that designated a tramp, a beggar, that's an undisputed fact. What is disputed is its origin in French. Lexicographer Alain Rey gives tow possible origins.
One would be the noun maraud that designates a tomcat in a regional dialect from central France and the word would come from mar onomatopoeia of the tomcat in heat, suffix -aud being derogatory.
Other possibility, and this is the one favoured by Alain Rey, would be Latin marra that is a sort of hoe and the the word maraudise was used in French at one time to describe peasant's work.

From either origin it's easy to see how the word could come to signify, in French before the English borrowed it from them, someone who roams, a vagabond, a tramp.

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A Marauder is a World War II American twin-engine bomber.

enter image description here

It was notoriously difficult to fly, and was nicknamed "The Widowmaker" because it killed so many pilots.

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You look like a pirate! –  Ste Dec 24 '13 at 18:31
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Lucy "Marauder" Montgomery was the only female to ever have taken a stint as the Dread Pirate Roberts. After her retirement from pirating, she settled in Prince Edward Island and penned Anne of Green Gables, a story ostensibly about an orphan girl who comes to live at the Green Gables "farm". Actually, it's a thinly veiled and mostly autobiographical account of her time on this turn-of-the-century sailing ship:

Alexander von Humboldt

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Marauder is a colloquial spelling of MaRouter, referring to a mother's wi-fi network.

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@Ste Thank you kind sir! –  Meat Trademark Dec 29 '13 at 9:51
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Marauder sounds good - we like pirates!

Hadn't managed to get a pirate hat yet, despite being an ardent believer in the Flying Spaghetti Monster!

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Stand by for your hat! –  Ste Jan 2 at 22:36
    
Ste - you are a star :-) –  Rory Alsop Jan 2 at 23:38
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A marauder is a highly-cherished hat, also a fictional vehicle in G.I. Joe.

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It's me, can't you see? Taking what's yours, and not politely.

You will shout out in distress for your beloved mother: Ma! Raw!
To have me reply, without any hint of regret or bother: Duh!

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I think it is a ten-round, bolt-action rifle that comes with three bore sizes: http://www.marauderairrifle.com/

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Marauders are combat specialists whose weapon of choice is the greataxe—a fearsome arm long associated with Eorzea's pirates. Their approach to battle is one of brute force, as they rely on pure strength and good steel to crush enemies and sunder weapons.consolegameswiki (FFIV)

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@Ste I found your meta post to quite informative as well. meta.english.stackexchange.com/a/4344/23999 –  Travis J Dec 30 '13 at 20:58
    
Have a pirate hat! –  Ste Dec 31 '13 at 8:37
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A Maru-der is a fan of The Most Famous Cat On All The Internet

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Have a hat on me! –  Ste Dec 24 '13 at 18:29
    
Thanks for the hat, @Ste. And the upvote moves me over 3000 -- let the question-closing party begin!!!! –  J.T. Grimes Dec 24 '13 at 18:42
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I'm shocked that until now, nobody has supplied the OP with the correct answer. In the singular, it is of course a comic hero/villain

enter image description here

In its plural form, Marauders

enter image description here

were mutant assassins employed by the X-Men archfiend Mister Sinister, with the purpose of assassination of other mutants, and act in unison as a commando strike-force to carry out acts of mass murder.

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It's a misspelling, most likely by someone who only heard and never saw the word, of "more OTTer."

(For those not well versed in 1190, an OTTer is a follower of the One True Thread. See http://forums.xkcd.com/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=101043&sid=fa708aa7e594f84a503df7ebb183b9d6 for the details.)

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Marauder actually takes its name from the notorious robber Jean-Marie de Maraud, who trolled the French highwayside looking for unsuspecting noblemen riding in carriages. However, after a while, becoming more daring, he took to attacking boats traveling along the Seine and the Loire.

He became so famous that, upon his capture in 1723, he inspired a legion of copycat thieves who tried to convince people that the government had actually failed to capture the correct person. Hence was born the verb marauder, as a form of plunder; it developed its nautical connotations later on.

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