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What is the proper word for someone who acts like you, or is doing the same thing you are doing? I was thinking about role playing, but it sounded very out of place.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by RegDwigнt Dec 9 '13 at 10:22

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
As you can see from the many answers posted so far, it is not clear what exactly you have in mind. Please provide further details, a sample sentence, a part of speech, really anything that helps make this a clear question with a single clear answer. Why is that someone acting like you? And to what end? Is it considered a good thing or a bad thing? Considered by whom? If "role playing" sounds very out of place, what exactly is the place it sounds very out of? –  RegDwigнt Dec 9 '13 at 10:25

6 Answers 6

we used to call those people copy-cats.

(esp. in children's use) a person who copies another's behavior, dress, or ideas.>

(I was young once.)

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Mimic

Can be used to describe someone who copies/imitates others. I dont think there is a word which specifically applies to mean someone copying oneself.

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I'd call that person an impersonator:

To assume the character or appearance of, especially fraudulently

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Façade might be another possibility as well.

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It can be "mimic" or "copycat"

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ape, aper, echoer, echoist, mimic (already suggested), mimicker, mocker, mockingbird,

In general, most synonyms of imitator.

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