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What does "Tell me if you love me" really mean?

I have two interpretations, please tell me which one is correct:

1) Tell me whether you are in love with me or not.

2) Tell me about XXX, to prove you love me.

e.g. Babe, what's the answer to that riddle? Tell me if you love me.

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Sorry for not elaborating the question clearly, actually, I am asking if there is a grammatical or punctuation rule that makes the sentence have one or the other meaning that I suggested.

I am not a native speaker, in English, the word "if" can be used to replace "do, did, does" in a question like: "Tell me. Do you love me?"--->"Tell me if you love me."

But in my native language, we can't do that because the word "if" has only one meaning and use, so I am curious how English native speakers distinguish between the two meanings "grammatically".

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closed as unclear what you're asking by RegDwigнt Nov 24 '13 at 13:09

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
What does "really mean" really mean? Is it "actually convey" or "very malicious"? Answer that question, and you'll have immediately answered yours. –  RegDwigнt Nov 24 '13 at 13:14
    
Sorry, could you take a look of my new added information in the question? Thanks –  Clinttt Nov 27 '13 at 18:06
    
Thank you for the edit. The point still stands. There is no way to "distinguish the meanings grammatically", if both meanings are expressed in an identical way. The only way to distinguish them is by using context. This is not limited to English, I might add. It is a safe bet that there are plenty of words and constructions that are distinct in English, but are identical in your mother tongue. Yet you do distinguish them in context. (We don't even need to know what your mother tongue is in order to be able to claim that, because ambiguity happens in all languages, all the time.) –  RegDwigнt Nov 27 '13 at 18:10
    
Oh now i get it! indeed, "there are plenty of words and constructions that are distinct in English, but are identical in your mother tongue" is true, i have never thought of that, this idea is a brainstorm to me! Thanks! –  Clinttt Nov 27 '13 at 18:22
    
I maintain, the meaning would be strictly contextual. –  Preetie Sekhon Nov 28 '13 at 5:03

2 Answers 2

I think it is more a situation based interpretation and is difficult to interpret on a 'language' only basis, without context and involving a bit of psychology:

   1. A child could be saying it to his mother.

   2. Someone in an already established relationship could be asking.

   3. Could be a reaffirmation of love.

Is less likely to be, "Tell me whether you are in love with me or not"; the tone seems to be too casual for that. However the possibility cannot be ruled out.

   4. Could be said in a playful tone, in jest.

The statement could have any hue, depending upon the context and the setting.

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Sorry, could you take a look of my new added information in the question? Thanks –  Clinttt Nov 27 '13 at 17:59

I think when you say only "Tell me if you love me", your first interpretation is more apt. If you use this after some sentence like example in your second interpretation, it ideally should have been "Tell me that(what I asked you) if you love me". In that case, your second interpretation would be correct.

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Sorry, could you take a look of my new added information in the question? Thanks –  Clinttt Nov 27 '13 at 17:59

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