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Just confused about something. If person A asks for some suggestions to person B, C and D via email.

Now one of three persons say C respond over the email with very detailed reply having some suggestions (some of them may be relevant and some maybe not). Now person A who has asked the question originally reply by just saying

Thanks for the write-up!!

All of above words are bold and double exclamation mark.

Can someone please recommend what this means in US English sense?

Strong approval or strong dis-approval sarcastically?

Many thanks.

Regards,

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Kristina Lopez, Bradd Szonye, Christi, JLG, aedia λ Nov 19 '13 at 21:09

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2 Answers 2

I'd characterize it as most likely strong approval.

Context is very important in sussing out sarcasm of course. But typically it would be expressed deadpan, not both bolded and with unnecessary exclamation marks.

It should also be mentioned that Americans have a reputation for being sarcasm-impaired. It would be a bit more fair to say we prefer bluntness, and when we do employ sarcasm we do it differently than Brits. This blog entry goes into it in detail. The general gist is that yes, American sarcasm exists, but isn't nearly as subtle.

In other words, a Brit may have written the above and mostly meant it, but in a subtle way been poking fun at the enthusiasm of the (otherwise very helpful) answer. An American, however, if they did indeed mean the above sarcastically, would more likely be saying the opposite of what is written: that the reply was utterly unwelcome. Doing that in a public email, with all the extra emphasis given above, would be exceptionally cruel. I find that highly unlikely.

So if its from an American, yes it was most likely meant seriously as an intensified thanking.

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Person A asks for information
Person C responds at length
Person A replies, Gee THAAAAANNNNKS rolls eyes

This would be saying that A asked C for help, C provided help and A was being sarcastic and ungrateful. Unless you have reason to believe A is an internet Troll or a jerk in general than you could consider "THANKS FOR THE WRITE UP!! As an appreciative remark. It sounds sincere to me.

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