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I'm looking for an abbreviation to indicate that I finished work for the day. Example usage: "I'm going home, its ... for me".

I found some examples on the internet, but I'm wondering what's most common to use.

  • EOB (end of business)
  • EOD (end of day)
  • COB (close of business)
  • ...

Wikipedia (End of Day) uses COB, but Googling didn't give much info about its usage.

EDIT: Context on where I would use it is writing (e-mail). I communicate with different teams in different time zones and it would be a handy way to let people know they don't need to expect a quick response from somebody because that person has already left the office (gone home).

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2  
BOC - beer o'clock ... for the light hearted. –  NamSandStorm Nov 13 '13 at 10:49
    
Curtains ....... –  mplungjan Nov 13 '13 at 10:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

From my experience, "COB" is a commonly used acronym to express delivery of a project or task by the end of business on a certain day. EDIT: You would only ever write this, not say it out loud to a colleague.

"I will make sure to send you that spreadsheet by COB Thursday."

I have rarely encountered the construction "end of _" in that context. I usually see it as "EOM" or "EOY" in financial or management reports.

If you're looking for something to use in everyday language with your co-workers, mplungjan's "It's curtains for me" or a phrase like "I'm throwing in the towel for today" is appropriate. Saying "It's COB for me" would sound weird.

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I've voted for @THEAO answer because I agree that COB is the most common business term for the end of the day.

However, I'd also like to offer the simple "home time".

I'll pick up that task tomorrow; it's home time for me.

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