Take the 2-minute tour ×
English Language & Usage Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

What is the difference between the following sentences? When can I use either?

I have worked here

and

I have been working here

share|improve this question
    
Be careful, if you say: I have worked here since 2010/leaving school etc. That would mean you are still working "here". –  Mari-Lou A Nov 13 '13 at 9:39
    
See english.stackexchange.com/q/21846/8019 (possible duplicate) –  TimLymington Nov 13 '13 at 10:40
    
Please accept the answer, if it has answered your question. –  Mari-Lou A Nov 13 '13 at 12:26
add comment

marked as duplicate by TimLymington, Mari-Lou A, Andrew Leach, p.s.w.g, choster Nov 14 '13 at 5:49

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1 Answer

'I have worked here' tells me you have, at some stage in your life, worked 'here'.

'I have been working here', suggests you have very recently been, and probably still are, working 'here'.

share|improve this answer
    
should be accepted as answer i guess –  Hussain Akhtar Wahid 'Ghouri' Nov 13 '13 at 7:52
    
@Mari-LouA Whilst that may be a valid comment about one or two I have answered, this one seems legitimate to ask. It is a fine point of grammar and not one necessarily easy to resolve with a grammar book. Besides I note you gave a comment yourself. And are we to try and second-guess people's ages? –  WS2 Nov 22 '13 at 9:31
1  
@Mari-LouA I think there are far worse examples than this one. Have you had an Irish association? Just interested you should say 'they would have commented "whenever" their their question was closed'. Touch of the Irish there! –  WS2 Nov 22 '13 at 10:57
    
Deleted my comments. It's not relevant to the OP's question :) –  Mari-Lou A Nov 22 '13 at 11:07
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.