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Why is the word "head" used in the following context?

Daddy he once told me 'son you be hard workin' man'
and Momma she once told me 'son you do the best you can'
but, then one day I met a man who came to me and said
'Hard work good, and hard work fine, but first take care of Head'
Smoke Two Joints - Sublime (perhaps they didn't originally write the song, but whatever)

First of all, is this related to the usage of "head" in "headshops"? I couldn't even find a clear answer on why this is the case, the wikipedia article on headshops says Jeff Glick opened "Head Shop" in New York, but does not explained why he called it that.

Some other explanations I saw floating around were "because drugs make your head feel good", "because it's for pot-heads", and something to do with the Grateful Dead and "dead-heads".

These all sound plausible, but does anyone have the definitive story behind the use of "head" in this sort of context?

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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

From urbandictionary.com:

To take care of head is to literally "take care" of your own personal head, specifically by usage of drugs.

Originally used in 1980 by the band The Toyes in the song Smoke Two Joints, the phrase became mainstream popularized when Sublime covered it in their album 40 Oz. to Heaven 16 years later.

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