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I've seen people writing : "Have an Octotastic day!". I've tried to search online but no useful results. From the context I feel its a synonym for "fantastic". I couldn't see any details on usage of that word? Is it something made-up?

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Yes, it's made-up. It seems to be a poor portmanteau (poortmanteau?!?) of 'October' and 'fantastic' I'd avoid it. –  Jim Oct 31 '13 at 1:52
    
@jim, My research had the word associated with octopi! Lol! –  Kristina Lopez Oct 31 '13 at 1:56
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It's very common for informal writing to add "-tastic" to words to make them sound more effusive. So it's not that October is especially fantastic, but merely that you didn't happen to encounter an occurrence of "Maytastic" or "Junetastic" when their time rolled around. Having said that, I will admit that some months lend themselves to portmanteauing more readily than others. I doubt, for example, that you'll run into an occurrence of "Februtastic," even though February is a truly outstanding month. –  Sven Yargs Oct 31 '13 at 2:13
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@ShobhitPuri- October was my first thought, it could very well be octopi, or octogenarian for that matter. The fact that we don't know means it's probably not something you should use unless the immediate context makes it clear. Have an Octoberiffic rest of the month! –  Jim Oct 31 '13 at 2:14
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@SvenYargs: Can you add your comment to an answer? I think it is a suitable answer to the question. –  MrHen Oct 31 '13 at 16:04
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At MrHen's kind suggestion, I'm submitting my earlier comment as an answer...

It's very common in informal writing for authors to add "-tastic" to words to make them sound more effusive. So it's not that October is especially fantastic, but merely that you didn't happen to encounter an occurrence of "Maytastic" or "Junetastic" when their time rolled around. Having said that, I will admit that some months lend themselves to portmanteauing more readily than others. I doubt, for example, that you'll run into an occurrence of "Februtastic," even though February is a truly outstanding month.

As Jim notes in one of his comments above, the suffix "-rific" (borrowed from "terrific") has a similar tendency to appear as a would-be excitement enhancer in a multitude of settings, as in "lobsterrific" or "ennuirific." Yet another such suffix (somewhat less commonly used) is "-tacular" (borrowed from "spectacular").

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See also english.stackexchange.com/q/22244/8019 (-rama). –  TimLymington Oct 31 '13 at 17:38
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I believe this comes from the gitHub, a cloud based version control system. Their logo is the Octocat and they often use the phrase "have an octotastic day".

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If I remember correctly, I saw it somewhere on gitHub only. You are right. –  Shobhit Puri Jun 25 at 15:17
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