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I've read how the use of the word I isn't always necessary when writing a resume as the employer already knows that the resume belongs to the job applicant. However some of these sentences sound incomplete without the word I, So i would like to know if its really necessary to include the word I in the beginning of these sentences.

1.I have maintained a clean record, both at school and work, by always acting with honesty.

2.I grew up in a respectable household and was brought up to appreciate and uphold moral values.

3.I strictly adhere to instructions and devote undivided attention to details.

OR

1.Maintained a clean record, both at school and work, by always acting with honesty.

2.Grew up in a respectable household and was brought up to appreciate and uphold moral values.

3.Strictly adhere to instructions and devote undivided attention to details.

Note: I am not asking anyone to proofread my sentences , I just want to know if i can use the sentences with or without I in the beginning.

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marked as duplicate by RegDwigнt Oct 21 '13 at 20:18

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1 Answer 1

A resume is usually written in telegraph (or telegram) style. The omission of I is perfectly acceptable, as is the omission of certain articles, such as

Responsible for supervision of over 1500 employees.

This is far from required, and you can adjust to suit the tone you think the employer will prefer. One of the main purposes is to control the overall length and make for a faster read.

While not presuming to advise on content, most of the examples you offer would not be found on typical resumes in the US, which tend to focus on factual matters such as details of education, employment and specific job responsibilities and accomplishments. The examples offered would more often be found in a cover letter or a reference letter.

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I know you were not asking for comments on the content but I cannot but agree that the things you have included are most inappropriate to a curriculum vitae. If you want anyone to note that you are a person of superior moral values ( I assume that is highly relevant to the position), you need to think of far more subtle ways of demonstrating the fact. –  WS2 Oct 21 '13 at 21:15

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