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what does the phrase "hog the mirror" mean? I think I am just not sure what "hog" means. I heard it in a talk show.

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The definition of HOG is "Harley Owner Group" –  David Wu Oct 19 '13 at 4:00
    
Hog. Please check a dictionary before asking here. –  Matt Эллен Oct 19 '13 at 6:19
    
That use of hog is informal, and may not be widely known. Are you a non-native speaker of English? Please also visit our sister site for Learners at ell.stackexchange.com –  Kris Oct 19 '13 at 6:57
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closed as off-topic by mplungjan, Matt Эллен, Kristina Lopez, MrHen, FumbleFingers Oct 19 '13 at 17:50

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To hog something is to not let someone else use it

verb, informal

keep or use all of (something) for oneself in an unfair or selfish way.

synonyms: monopolize, dominate, take over, corner, control

So in a house with one mirror, you can have two people needing to use it, if one of them keeps standing in front of it, he/she is hogging the mirror.

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People don't only 'hog the mirror', they 'hog' much else besides. They 'hog' the phone (not so common since mobiles arrived), the bathroom, the cooker, the breakfast cereal etc. The point is a 'hog' is a pig. And the reference is to someone behaving, perhaps figuratively, as a pig would behave, and grasping everything to him or herself.

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@J.R. Your edit J.R. was smart but not smart enough. You have missed the much larger grammatical error in my comment. You have strained at a gnat and swallowed a camel! Spot the now 'deliberate mistake'! –  WS2 Oct 19 '13 at 15:43
    
Sorry, it's not my job to proofread your work. Something jumped out at me, so I fixed it. This is not a challenge, a competition etc. –  J.R. Oct 19 '13 at 17:46
    
@J.R. Well I'll tell you then. It should be 'grasping everything to HIM or herself', not 'his'. It is the residue of dialect speech with which I grew up. In Norfolk they say 'He should be ashamed of HIS-self'. –  WS2 Oct 19 '13 at 18:07
    
Well, what are you telling me for? Click the edit button and fix it. –  J.R. Oct 19 '13 at 18:09
    
If it's the "residue of dialect speech," then is it really a "grammatical error"? Or is it merely a dialectal difference? Who are we to tell those from Norfolk that they habitually use the "wrong" pronoun? Besides, we're only talking about a pig – or are we? (Or did you not notice that ambiguity?) Had I been your editor, I would have suggested more changes than the one you made. Thankfully, though, I'm not your editor, and besides, your point was made just fine. My original intent was merely to clean up a stray terminator.. –  J.R. Oct 20 '13 at 10:58
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