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FAQ stands for 'Frequently asked questions', with the plural being implicit in the acronym FAQ. But it is common to see the word 'FAQs' being used, which treat the word FAQ as an object in itself, and an s being added to its end in order to pluralize it.

Which one is the correct usage for FAQ ?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

While the acronym does indeed stand for Frequently Asked Questions, in many cases, there is an implied list of (or perhaps document containing) in the acronym's usage, which is why it's treated as a singular object. For example, I could have a FAQ that covers home buying and a separate one that has questions regarding home purchasing. In this case, I might suggest that you check out the FAQs, meaning The lists of frequently asked questions.

In this case, I see nothing wrong with adding an s to pluralize the implied list (making it clear there there are multiple sets).

However, I would suggest that if you have a single list, and the s merely refers to the fact that multiple questions exist, the s is not needed.

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Hmm... a set of FAQ entities can be called as FAQs. –  Arjun J Rao Feb 19 '11 at 1:28
    
I suppose that the home purchasing FAQ is a bit more upscale than the home buying FAQ. (Or is it that the former is for those of Romantic inclination, and the latter for the Germanic?) –  mgkrebbs Feb 19 '11 at 6:49
    
@mgkrebbs Ha! I intended buying/selling. Fail. –  Dusty Feb 19 '11 at 7:19

I disagree that FAQ always stands for Frequently Asked Questions; a single question that is frequently asked is also a frequently asked question, or FAQ. Thus, a list of such questions is a list of FAQs.

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