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Can someone please help me understand what "barefoot notes" means?

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The fact that there are a few Google hits for a string of two words doesn't mean that it is an idiom. It looks to me like a title someone's made up like 'Letters from a Small Island' or 'News from Lake Wobegon'. However, if it becomes as popular as Bryson's books, it may one day be recognised as an idiom or at least as a collocation. –  Edwin Ashworth Oct 12 '13 at 23:11
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Please indicate where you've seen the term - preferably with a link - and what effort you've made to look it up. Please refer to Where can I find answers to simple and basic questions? –  TrevorD Oct 12 '13 at 23:21
    
No one called anyone an idiot, or dumb, or any such adjective. Calm down. :) –  mikhailcazi Oct 13 '13 at 10:29
    
One reason I asked "where you've seen the term - preferably with a link" is because it is not a familiar term, and therefore the context may actually help us to understand it so that we can help explain it to you. That has nothing whatsoever to do with you being a non-native speaker - and I had no idea whether you were a native or non-native speaker. And no-one called you "dumb", "idiot" OR "stupid" - nor even implied it. I merely pointed you to some of the site guidance because, to quote your own words, you are "a very new user [and] not familiar with how to ask a question". –  TrevorD Oct 13 '13 at 12:10
    
As you are a non-native speaker, you may also find our sister site useful: English Language Learners. –  TrevorD Oct 13 '13 at 12:10

2 Answers 2

This reminds me of the barefoot doctor in Mao's China. In a similar vein barefoot notes probably refers to them being basic and sketchy.

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I've never heard the term "barefoot notes". The other comment was not intended to criticize you, just to show that he's never heard of it either. It does show up in a web search, but there is no consistent meaning. My best guess is that it is just another untranslatable English phrase, having as many meanings as there are people using it.

If I had to guess, I'd say that it described very informal notes or thoughts about things - going barefoot in this country is very informal.

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