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What is the difference between these two expressions?

  1. Your hair needs brushing.
  2. Your hair needs to be brushed.
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Hugely related: english.stackexchange.com/questions/24163/… –  Andrew Leach Oct 9 '13 at 16:18
    
@AndrewLeach Yes. This question is answered there. –  MετάEd Oct 9 '13 at 16:31
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marked as duplicate by Barrie England, MετάEd, Andrew Leach, user49727, choster Oct 9 '13 at 17:38

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2 Answers

There is no difference. Just two different ways to say the same thing.

  • Your hair needs to have a brush applied to it. -
  • Your hair needs to be brushed.
  • Your hair needs a brushing.
  • Your hair is very ugly and should be cut off completely. Forget the brush.

Sorry about that last one. I am just joking. Your hair is fine. :-)

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No difference, it is purely stylistic.

A very small hint that in 1. you have to do it yourself, and in 2. you will have it done

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I beg to differ. Either one could be done by yourself or another. –  Cyberherbalist Oct 9 '13 at 16:06
    
I am British, and I just mentioned the possibility of a very tiny difference, as the common use in our tiny and remote islands. –  ex-user2728 Oct 9 '13 at 18:40
    
Not so tiny, and not so remote! I lived there for a few years, once upon a time, and I found I could not see the sea from Cheltenham! Even from Cleeve Hill! BTW, I did not downvote you. –  Cyberherbalist Oct 9 '13 at 19:04
    
Being British does not make one make that distinction. –  Matt Эллен Oct 10 '13 at 9:30
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