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I'm trying to find the best way to describe being so physically deformed, that its only, somewhat recognizable, feature is its own body shape. Mutant doesn't work for me, as it implies the reason of deformation, and I need something more general. Freak seams right, but sounds silly to me, so I hopping for something else. I was thinking about word chimera, but I'm not sure if it's the right way to use it.

Also, I don't care how offensive the word is. Thank you.

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3 Answers 3

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The word you are looking for is gargoyle.

Although coined in connection with carvings and sculptures (grotesquely carved waterspout), Gargoyle can be applied to a person with a grotesque appearance.

An intriguing word is invunche, a monstrous human creature from a disturbing South American legend. One of these can be seen on youtube - you don't forget the image easily after reading the legend.

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Yes, I think that's it. Thank you. So many times I drawn gargoyles, but for some reason the word slip my mind completely. –  alphabethater Sep 29 '13 at 18:59

How does aberration or anomaly sound to you?

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+1 for aberration. It might not get better than that –  TsSkTo Sep 29 '13 at 14:10
    
Great, nice to see you've found your suitable word. –  CreativeWriting Sep 29 '13 at 14:13
    
That wasn't me, sorry. Actually I've never heard the word aberration being used, so I'm not gonna use It as well. But I'm gonna check it out, thank you. –  alphabethater Sep 29 '13 at 19:11
    
great :) you could just check the thesaurus for a larger variety of words –  CreativeWriting Sep 30 '13 at 13:44

ogre

A person who is felt to be particularly cruel, brutish, or hideous.

There's always your grotesque of course (n. & adj.). I you happen to be in need of something more neutral, you can settle for mangled, and to remain perfectly objective, you can go with disfigured.

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Mangled seams like such an expressive word. Is it commonly used? I don't think I hear it before. Thank you. –  alphabethater Sep 30 '13 at 7:42
    
The word is not too common, but I've seen it used in more than one register: conversational, journalistic, literary, and also academic. Expressive is an understatement. I shudder to say it, but I find the word onomatopoeic. I know, gross. From COCA: Till's skull was falling off and his mangled face revealed how horribly he had been beaten for allegedly " whistling at a White woman. But it's not pejorative, like ogre. –  Talia Ford Sep 30 '13 at 8:15
    
I've really learn something just now. Thanks again. –  alphabethater Sep 30 '13 at 8:21

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