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I'm filling an employment reference form and I'm not sure what this means. Does it mean, are you related in terms of kinship or related professionally. It also asks to state your relationship.

Thanks

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3 Answers 3

I'd be surprised if "related" here doesn't mean

belonging to the same family. [Entry 2]

Its normal that prospective employers won't want family members to give you a reference as they expect them to be biased.

Employers will also want to know what your professional relationship is with your reference so they can gauge how reliable the reference is. The choice of the word relationship in this case is unfortunate and could possible have been replaced with "affiliation", "connection" or even just "professional relationship"

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Since this is an employment reference form, the only meaningful way to interpret this is as 'related in terms of family'. Eg: Cousin, brother, father, aunt, etc.

However, if the form was asking you if you know the candidate at a professional level or if he's your neighbour or someting of this sort, the question should have been more like this: What is your relationship with the candidate?

And as an answer, you may write things like:

He's my brother/student or something like it

He's my neighbour

None, but I've seen what she can do...

I hope this is clear.

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Yes, it asking whether you are related by blood or marriage (and may be tempted to turn a blind eye to the candidate's faults).

They are looking for a disclosure of potential nepotism. That word is related to the Latin nepos (nephew). Favoring your family goes back a long way.

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