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I've got a sentence:

Cleaned the lake from the ice.

Question: Does it really mean "the lake with no ice on it" or does it mean that "the ice now is clear."?

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That seems more like an idiom than a literal sentence. Do you have any more context? –  James Webster Sep 18 '13 at 12:55
    
child play a video game where he should to click on ice-cracks floating on the lake surface. When level completed it appears an achievement with this text. Is it correct or not. English is non-native for me, so it's a little hard to find mistakes if they are exists –  Sugar Sep 18 '13 at 13:02
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Minimally, the subject and the object of the sentence are the wrong way round. It probably means: The ice has been cleaned from the lake, but you might understand it better with a different verb; clean doesn't seem like the right word here. Perhaps the ice was cleared or the ice was removed –  James Webster Sep 18 '13 at 13:07
    
@James Webster I think you have an answer there. –  Zibbobz Sep 18 '13 at 13:17
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This is just poor English, like 'all your base...'. –  Mitch Sep 18 '13 at 13:23
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closed as unclear what you're asking by Mitch, Edwin Ashworth, user49727, choster, Brian Hooper Sep 20 '13 at 7:51

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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Minimally, the subject and the object of the sentence are the wrong way round.

It probably means:

The ice has been cleaned from the lake.

You might understand it better with a different verb; clean doesn't seem like the right word here.

Perhaps

...the ice was cleared...

or

...the ice was removed...

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True, but I'd also say it's valid if it were to 'clean the ice of the lake', which would mean to remove the ice from it. –  itsols Sep 18 '13 at 14:15
    
I'd understand what you were saying, but I still find it a bit unwieldy. –  James Webster Sep 18 '13 at 14:28
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Well, I'm a native English speaker, and that sentence cleaned the lake from the ice is telling me that the lake has been cleaned (or cleared of something within it) by someone standing on the (presumably adjacent) ice, and not that the ice has been removed at all.

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I'm a native English speaker, and that string ('Cleaned the lake from the ice.') is telling me to avoid that particular video game. Unless the game-play is astounding. (I had to use the additional information in the OP's later comment, of course, and then I judged that a pragmatically based answer was the best bet.) –  Edwin Ashworth Sep 18 '13 at 15:51
    
i'm non-native english speaker and now I'm sure that my english was better then someone who wrote this sentence to me. –  Sugar Sep 30 '13 at 6:30
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