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Do either or both of the two sentences below require a question mark?

  • Just confirming that we are still on tomorrow for our 3 pm meeting with S&P management?

  • I am free to chat this evening as well, if that works better for you?

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This question appears to be off-topic because it is better suited to English Language Learners –  TrevorD Sep 9 '13 at 23:59
    
Where has the question mark come from? Why do you think it's needed? –  Kris Sep 10 '13 at 6:35

2 Answers 2

No, those do not need question marks. They are indirect questions, and as such, do not require a question mark.

From The Grammar Bible by Michael Strumpf (p. 536):

The indirect question asks a question in a declarative manner. The difference between the direct and indirect quesionts will be subtle.

DIRECT: What kind of pasta is that?

INDIRECT: She asked what kind of pasta that is.

The direct question always ends with a question mark.

Your examples should be written:

Just confirming that we are still on tomorrow for our 3 pm meeting with S&P management.

I am free to chat this evening as well, if that works better for you.

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It sounds trite to say so, but for a question mark to be appropriate you have to actually ask a question. For your examples to be questions, you would have to re-write them, for example:

Are we still on tomorrow for our 3 pm meeting with S&P management? I need to confirm it today.

I am free to chat this evening as well. Does that work better for you?

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