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Below is a sentence from my book review. "China" is the name of the author.

Is it correct or incorrect to have a comma after the word pay?

China finds a way to dissect both a woman's desire to find love and her penchant to make a man pay, if he plays around with that love.

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marked as duplicate by mplungjan, Hugo, TrevorD, tchrist, aedia λ Aug 29 '13 at 1:24

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
You might find our sister site English Language Learners useful. –  TrevorD Aug 27 '13 at 11:04

1 Answer 1

I don't think you need a comma. I always look if one needs an breathing space (sounds archaic but is almost always correct!). In this case it's more 'difficult' to read if you place a comma. According to the real grammatical rules, I don't think you need a comma either. Hope this helps.

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I'd say this is easier (and especially for narrators who need to breathe): China finds a way to dissect both a woman's desire to find love, and her penchant to make a man pay if he plays around with that love. The comma I choose is not grammatically 'necessary' - some might even have a pet rule forbidding it - but punctuation is essentially here to help the reader / narrator, not make money for grammar-lawyers. –  Edwin Ashworth Aug 27 '13 at 10:49

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