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I'd like to use the expression find sanctuary instead of find refuge. Would it be fine?

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I don't see why not. books.google.com/ngrams/… –  mplungjan Aug 26 '13 at 7:56
    
I want your answer to be THE answer. How do I make it so? –  Warren van Rooyen Aug 26 '13 at 8:04
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@WarrenvanRooyen - It's important that you add as much context as much as possible in your questions. This one is lacking context at the moment and is hence very basic at the moment and may get closed. –  Mohit Aug 27 '13 at 5:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't see why not

Have a look at this NGRAM

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Find refuge is used more and has less religious connotations

Ngram of find refuge vs find sanctuary

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You didn't compare "find sanctuary" with "find refuge". What was the motive behind comparing the present tense of the verb, find, with the simple past, found? I agree the word, sanctuary is a possible synonym for refuge but without any context how can you be sure? –  Mari-Lou A Aug 26 '13 at 15:27
    
The question was "can one say find sanctuary" and the answer is yes. It was not "which is used more, find refuge or find sanctuary" so I did not see the need for a comparison. The comparison would not show the validity of saying find sanctuary. It does show refuge being used more books.google.com/ngrams/… –  mplungjan Aug 26 '13 at 15:55
    
Fair point the OP's question was very basic and limited, there were no specifications. But if he had asked Can one say, "find shelter"? Your answer would still have been "I don't see why not"? It is customary for more experienced users to ask for greater detail and context. –  Mari-Lou A Aug 26 '13 at 17:00
    
But I was not in doubt what he meant. Find shelter is more out of the rain than out of trouble. –  mplungjan Aug 26 '13 at 17:09
    
@Mari-Lou A. The question was simple and earned a simple answer. Don't assume that complicating a situation makes you a more experienced user. You're nitpicking and also provided no clear answer yourself. Your involvement on this question is self-serving. –  Warren van Rooyen Aug 28 '13 at 7:56

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