Take the 2-minute tour ×
English Language & Usage Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hi fellow language enthusiasts, so what does "Close to the Vest" or "Chest" mean may I ask? Or more appropriately "Chest" or "Vest" because I also learn that Chest appeared First. But what does the phrase mean at all? Any help is eagerly appreciated.

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by choster, p.s.w.g, J.R., aedia λ, TrevorD Aug 15 '13 at 23:02

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions that can be answered using commonly-available references are off-topic. A list of these references can be found here: List of general references" – choster, p.s.w.g, J.R.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
possible duplicate of What does "somebody plays things close to the vest" mean? –  aedia λ Aug 15 '13 at 21:39

2 Answers 2

Keep/hold your cards close to one's chest/vest means keep your intended actions secret (as if one were playing a card game).

share|improve this answer

The phrase is an idiom for keeping something that is sensitive to you personal and not readily available to anyone but the few that you trust.

Example:

Jonny's struggle with his uprising addiction to cocaine was a matter he kept close to his chest.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.