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Hillary Clinton said as follows:

If the Voting Rights Act is not fixed, Clinton warned, "Citizens will be disenfranchised, victimized by the law instead of served by it, and that progress — that historical progress toward a more perfect union — will go backward instead of forward."

Is "instead of served by it" grammatically correct? Shouldn't it be "instead of being served by it?"

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3 Answers

"Instead of served by it" is grammatically correct. Changing the phrase to "instead of being served by it" slows down the passion and pace of the sentence by adding passive voice.

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1  
+1. Yes, an example of ellipsis. –  Barrie England Aug 13 '13 at 6:20
    
It is already in the passive voice, just with an omitted auxiliary; adding ‘being’ is adding the auxiliary (or not removing it), not adding passive voice. –  Janus Bahs Jacquet Aug 13 '13 at 16:29
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Let us analyse by factorisation.

FYI, factorisation: A*(B + C) = A*B + A*C

Citizens will be {disenfranchised, victimized by the law instead of served by it}

=

Citizens will
{be disenfranchised, victimized by the law}
instead of
{be served by the law}.

Factorisation seems to indicate that the phrase is balanced and rational.

The alternative balanced phrase would be,

Citizens {being disenfranchised, victimized by the law}
instead of
{being served by the law}.

i.e., progressing/ongoing passive-perfect participle form

Citizens being disenfranchised, victimized by the law instead of being served by it, will cause that progress — that historical progress toward a more perfect union — to go backward instead of forward.

With more factorisation ...

Citizens being disenfranchised, victimized by the law instead of served by it, will cause that progress — that historical progress toward a more perfect union — to go backward instead of forward.

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You can include "being" in both places, or omit it in both places:

Citizens will be disenfranchised, [being] victimized by the law instead of [being] served by it, ...

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