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I encountered the word I am searching for in R.C.Robertson-Glasgow's Crusoe on Cricket; but, since I do not have the book, nor online access to it, I cannot search for that word.

The meaning is roughly "to watch an act over and over and over again in mind's eye" and in the context he mentioned of a cricket match that can be watched over and over before going to bed.

Any help?

Edit: In response to comments, I checked the list of all the words starting with "auto" and could not find it. If that is the case, then it could be a word, he coined.

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Just a guess: auto-replay? –  verbose Aug 2 '13 at 7:15
    
You'll have to be more specific in your question. What kind of help are you asking for? –  Jim Aug 2 '13 at 14:17
    
@Jim If I was any specific, then I would not have asked this question. And the help I require is pretty self-explanatory. –  Sniper Clown Aug 3 '13 at 0:22
    
On the one hand, there aren’t many pre-existing verbs that start with auto- in the Dictionary: autoclave, auto-destruct, autograph, autolithograph, autolyse, automate, autonomize, autopsy, auto-suggest, autotomize, autotype, autoxidize. On the other hand, you can always make more of them by prefixing auto- to an existing verb, so it was probably one of them (well, unless autotomize trips your trigger). It’s pretty hard to guess what you’re needing here. –  tchrist Aug 3 '13 at 1:58
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In view of the fact that the OP has searched through the list of words beginning with "auto" and did not find the one he was looking for, the question/title could be modified to: "Word which might begin with "auto" and means....etc." Doesn't roll off the tongue but it reflects more truthfully the context. What does Mahmud think? –  Mari-Lou A Aug 3 '13 at 8:45
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4 Answers

If the context was visualizing something repetitive to help with relaxation before bed, he may have been speaking of autohypnosis.

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The person who is re-living the cricket match has put his mind on auto-replay.

"Chester put his mind on auto-replay, visualizing the cricket match over and over again in his mind."

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

As it turns out the word was coined which is why it is difficult to locate. A UCI researcher named Brian Williams was kind enough to find out the word from the actual book. The word is: auto-invigilation.

It is from the 1966 edition of Crusoe on Cricket: The Cricket Writings of R.C. Robertson-Glasgow with an introduction by Alan Ross. lan Ross - London, 1966.

"The Art of Watching" begins on page 65 and concludes at page 68.

"It is not easy to say what precise form of watching cricket gives a man the greatest pleasure, but I think that perhaps the most deep enjoyment is to be derived from what we may term ‘auto-invigilation,’ the mental going-over, preferably in bed – with no prospect of fielding till after lunch on the next day – of some rare and long desired innings; …”

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Difficult to locate? I'd say, impossible to even imagine such a word. To me the coined expression suggests that the speaker invigilates himself, which is impossible, making sure he doesn't cheat at an exam. –  Mari-Lou A Aug 15 '13 at 0:30
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autoanalysis?

similar to self-analysis: v. the process of analyzing oneself. Although the two words could be considered identical the context would clarify the meaning.

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