Take the 2-minute tour ×
English Language & Usage Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to know what the grammatical construct "kind of + v" is?

I kind of like cold weather

or

I kind of eat everything".

share|improve this question
    
Kind of in ODO: informal rather; to some extent. –  Andrew Leach Jul 15 '13 at 9:34
    
Although it's informal, I suppose it's classed as an adverb. –  Andrew Leach Jul 15 '13 at 9:35
1  
To whoever marked it as GR, try to find this information easily... –  mplungjan Jul 15 '13 at 9:42
1  
@mplungjan onelook.com/?w=kind+of&ls=a –  Andrew Leach Jul 15 '13 at 10:19
1  
Knowing it's an idiom is more valuable than knowing it's an adverb; knowing it's an adverb tells you nothing you don't already know, but idioms have to be specified as such. –  John Lawler Jul 15 '13 at 16:21
show 1 more comment

closed as off-topic by Andrew Leach, Matt Эллен, p.s.w.g, J.R., MετάEd Jul 15 '13 at 13:15

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions that can be answered using commonly-available references are off-topic. A list of these references can be found here: List of general references" – Andrew Leach, Matt Эллен, p.s.w.g, J.R., MετάEd
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1 Answer

Kind of and the synonym sort of are classified as non-standard synonyms of the adverb somewhat

http://englishplus.com/grammar/00000231.htm

The expressions kind of or sort of to mean "rather," "partially," or "somewhat" are nonstandard.

Both expressions literally mean "type of" or "variety of."

So I would also classify them as adverbs

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.