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I usually use the "tell me" on calls. For example when I pick up call I like to answer in this way: "Yes John, tell me"

Is it a good practice to talk on call in this way?

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I've never once heard this in my entire life. I would go so far as to say it is not English. –  RegDwigнt Jun 26 '13 at 9:15
    
No. This is very impolite. You might also enjoy our sister site: English Language Learners. –  Matt Эллен Jun 26 '13 at 10:26
    
Is this a direct translation of what you use in your native language? Politeness words in any language tend to be weird when taken literally. E.g. "How are you?": why "how"? That makes no sense! Your "tell me" sounds rude in English, but in your language from constant use, might be unremarkable. –  Mitch Jun 26 '13 at 11:49
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closed as primarily opinion-based by Kristina Lopez, tchrist, Mitch, Andrew Leach, MετάEd Jun 26 '13 at 13:18

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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It depends what effect you're trying to get and whether it's getting you that effect. Most likely, it's just annoying people -- particularly people you speak to often.

Using a non-standard reply where courtesy demands a standard one forces the listener to try to figure out whether you meant something special, distracting them from the flow of the conversation. While they're trying to figure out what it is you are asking them to tell you, they're probably losing the thought of what they wanted to tell you.

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In movies, someone who answers the phone "Talk to me!" is usually portraying an abrupt, blunt person. –  Hack Saw Jun 26 '13 at 9:11
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