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I am a computer programmer and I come across the word "default" a lot, usually a statement would say:

Default A to B, and I understand it as follows:

A has the value B by default

is this a correct understanding? What is the difference between this statement and

Default A from B

--Edit

to explain more, consider the following paragraph:

The user clicks on the registration link, fills in his personal details (Name, address..), clicks the "Next" button, the account owner details page will be displayed. There is an "account owner name" field and a "default account owner to the user's name" link, if the user clicks on this link, default the "account owner name" field to the current user name.

Does the last sentence in the paragraph mean "set the value of the 'account owner name' to be the current user name" or Does it mean "get the current user name value and set it into the 'account owner name'"?

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Need context, not just a short phrase in isolation: complete sentences, maybe more than one leading up to the confusing phrase. Ideally link us to the real world example you are trying to understand. –  MετάEd Jun 26 '13 at 3:08
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1 Answer

Default A to B essentially means "Set the value of A to the value stored in B."

Default A from B means "Set the value of A from the storage location called B."

In most cases, these are equivalent statements.

Default here is being used colloquially, meaning "set the value of this storage location prior to it being offered to the user for possible editing."

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