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We often ask "Are you veg?", "Are you non-veg?" to ask if someone is a vegetarian or a non-vegetarian.

Is there a hypernym for both of them? So you could ask "What is your [...]?" or maybe "Are you a [...]?" In the same way we might ask for someone's gender.

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Now we know the context, I would suggest perhaps "Vegetarian? Yes/No" for a field label. Altho' I am not a vegetarian, I do not eat a lot of meat, and I do like vegetables. I would certainly not want to be described as "nonveg". Altho' we know this is for a 'field', we still don't know the context. E.g. if it were being asked of a restaurant's (potential) customers, I think there is a real risk of it being misunderstood as asking whether they eat/want vegetables, especially if they are not fluent in English. –  TrevorD Jul 24 '13 at 13:29

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I'm not sure why the confusion with the terms veg and non-veg. I live in the northeast US and I hear these terms as well as veggie with some frequency, although it might be because I hang with a vegan/vegetarian/omnivorous crowd where we ask about these things.

I don't have a hypernym specifically for meat-eating, but when I am hosting guests, I ask them if they have dietary restrictions or preferences or, in the case of my kosher/halal friends, strictures. These terms cover the gambit of differences in eating habits, so they would cover your terms as well.

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I'm not very clear on your question because "veg" and "non-veg" are not words or phrases we use in English. IF you're referring to someone who does not eat meat, that is a vegetarian.

It is reasonable to ask "Are you a vegetarian?" or "Do you eat meat?" A more general way to ask is "Do you have any dietary restrictions?" or "Is there anything you don't eat?" There is no real conversational opposite to vegetarian, so we'd just say "I'm not a vegetarian."

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+1 Also bearing in mind that the term "vegetarian" can be loosely interpreted, i.e. I never eat meat but I sometimes eat fish. –  Mari-Lou A Jun 24 '13 at 7:42
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@Mari-LouA Sometimes known as a pescetarian. –  bib Jun 24 '13 at 10:58
    
‘Carnivore’ is conversational enough, I’d say, and I’ve often heard it used as a sort-of antonym to ‘vegetarian’ (or any other part of the non-carnivore spectrum). @Mari-LouA, someone who eats fish is not a vegetarian, even if they claim they are or associate with the ‘vegetarian lifestyle’—if such a thing even exists. They may be termed pescetarians or semi-vegetarians, but not vegetarians. (This happens to be one of my pet peeves) –  Janus Bahs Jacquet Jul 25 '13 at 15:45
    
@JanusBahsJacquet I said "loosely interpreted" I know of many vegetarians who claim to be such but then eat a nice bowl of spaghetti with clams or mussels. :) –  Mari-Lou A Jul 25 '13 at 15:48
    
Yes, I know quite a few of those myself, and I am forever telling them that there is nothing whatsoever wrong or ‘lesser’ about being a pescetarian than being a vegetarian—but vegetarians are they none. :-) –  Janus Bahs Jacquet Jul 25 '13 at 15:52

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