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After much searching, I am still finding (potentially) conflicting information regarding commas before subordinate conjunctions when they come at the end of the sentence.

Specifically, I have read that a comma before while indicates 'whereas.' No comma indicates time.

However, commas are also used before subordinate conjunctions when the subordinate clause is non-essential to the meaning of the sentence.

Therefore, I am confused whether to use a comma before while in the following sentence. Is there a rule you can refer me to?

"Stick to your guns, Lola," he replied happily, while pinching both of my cheeks.

Based on the above information, there should be no comma since the two actions are happening at the same time. However, the information also seems non-essential to the meaning of the sentence, which means that it would require a comma. Very confusing!

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Please refer to the middle two paragraphs of the answer I have already provided to your earlier question here. In any event, you've already answered your own question: "commas are also used before subordinate conjunctions when the subordinate clause is non-essential to the meaning of the sentence". I cannot understand why you say "Based on the above information, there should be no comma since the two actions are happening at the same time." - Nowhere is that stated or implied in your earlier comments - and it's nonsense! –  TrevorD Jun 16 '13 at 23:08
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For questions like these, it helps to provide links to where you are finding this potentially conflicting advice. Perhaps you've misinterpreted something you've read. Perhaps one of the authors is not a credible source. Perhaps one of the sources includes an exception that you haven't noticed. Without any further pointers other than "After much searching, I am still finding (potentially) conflicting information..." we're all at the point where essentially we need to try to find conflicting information of our own if we're to resolve your conundrum. –  J.R. Jun 16 '13 at 23:53
    
The question seems to be based on false preconceptions, without which I think it leads nowhere relevant to ELU. I've voted to close as Too Localised, but it might be salvageable for English Language Learners –  FumbleFingers Jun 17 '13 at 0:55
    
It's a good question, y'all. –  jlovegren Jun 17 '13 at 1:07
    
Was that while required there? Is that word that is causing the confusion? I think the while is superfluous in the context. –  Kris Jun 17 '13 at 5:54
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3 Answers 3

Personally and for the sake of clarity, I would structure your sentence as shown below.

"Stick to your guns, Lola," he replied, happily, while pinching both of my cheeks.

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Hi, and welcome to EL&U, ABW. We like answers to be fact based, not solely opinion based, and as such, love to see links to sources which support your answer. –  medica Dec 30 '13 at 0:12
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As far as I know, "at the same time/although" and "whereas/in contrast" are two different entries for the conj. 'while.' The comma is necessary in those two cases.

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Perhaps the poster perceives the dependent clause in the example sentence to be non-essential. That is, he or she perceives the pinching of the cheeks as not really modifying or limiting the meaning of the first clause. If this is true, then the poster would be inclined to place a comma before the conjunction. However, the poster would also be inclined to leave it out based on the rule that "when 'while' indicates time and precedes a dependent clause, no comma should precede it. Therein may lie the confusion.

Can we assume that all dependent clauses when following the independent clause and introduced by the conjunction "while" are de facto restrictive, meaning no comma is necessary?

Or can we assume that all dependent clauses when following the independent clause and introduced by the conjunction "while" do not take a comma whether the dependent clause is restrictive or not?

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