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How do you use the construction "how many X" correctly? For example, are these right?

How many political parties in Ukraine?

How many deputies in Ukraine?

How many condoms in your pocket?

How many months of the year?

How many holidays in a year?

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You may find English Language Learners useful. –  jwpat7 Jun 13 '13 at 18:35
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closed as off topic by Lynn, RegDwigнt Jun 13 '13 at 8:44

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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, you are using the correct form of how many, but regarding the whole question, you'd better use the "are there" to make it nicer.

How many political parties are there in Ukraine?
How many deputies are there in Ukraine?

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I can add are/is there to all my sentences? Or? –  Mediator Jun 13 '13 at 6:33
    
No, since you are asking about the quantity and do not exactly know how many (1 or more), you must use the plural form. –  Reza Saberi Jun 13 '13 at 6:41
    
@Mediator Note: for countable nouns use "How many X are there?"; for uncountable nouns use "How much X is there?". For example: "How many fish are in the sea?" vs. "How much water is in the sea?". –  p.s.w.g Jun 13 '13 at 7:26
    
And note dual usages: How much coffee is there left in the jar? / How many coffees did table 32 order? –  Edwin Ashworth Jun 13 '13 at 8:41
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