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Every so often I want to ask the reader to look back at a page in the current book they have in their hands (my Ph. D. thesis). If I write something like

Critically, breaking a mathematical task down into small, individually-masterable steps can help the topic seem less daunting (Mighton, 2003) -- compare Gowers's "quantum of progress" in research mathematics (p. 50).

... it looks vaguely like I'm trying to direct the reader to page 50 of Mighton's book; I'm not. Is there something akin to "ibid." that I could use instead of the cumbersome

Critically, breaking a mathematical task down into small, individually-masterable steps can help the topic seem less daunting (Mighton, 2003) -- compare Gowers's "quantum of progress" in research mathematics (p. 50 of the current work).

(or similar)?

Update

Critically, breaking a mathematical task down into small, individually-masterable steps can help the topic seem less daunting (Mighton, 2003) -- compare Gowers's "quantum of progress" in research mathematics (Chapter 3, p. 50).

A variation on the suggestion from @terdon. Does this avoid the ambiguity I was alluding to, without being cumbersome? I'm not sure, but I'll mark the answer as accepted. I'd still love to know if I can use c.w. or similar as an abbreviation for "current work".

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I'd say: (see page 50). Or, better yet: (see Section 3.5). A section number would probably be better because it's less likely to change from version to version; you could add one paragraph to Chapter 1 at the last minute, and repaginate your entire thesis. –  J.R. Jun 1 '13 at 20:30
    
@J.R.-- luckily LaTeX takes care of keeping the cross references consistent!s –  Joe Corneli Jun 1 '13 at 21:05
    
Sorry, I just came upon this question again. The version you chose does not remove ambiguity. You need the see that is the special term used in this context. In the example phrase you have posted, in the absence of see, I would think you are referring to chapter 3 of Gower's book, not yours. –  terdon Sep 13 '13 at 0:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The general format would be something like

see Section X, page Y

As long as you don't include that in the same parenthesis as the citation itself, it is clear that you are referring to the book the reader is holding. The operative word here is see a simple page number in parentheses is much more ambiguous.

On a side note, if you're a Mathematician writing a thesis I will assume you are using LaTeX, which provides the \ref{} command precisely to facilitate referring to other parts of the same document.

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Would "see Section X, page Y, above" be better? –  Joe Corneli Jun 1 '13 at 21:06
    
Well, not really. If this is several pages away it is not, strictly speaking, above. It is also not necessary, see Section X, page Y is quite clear. –  terdon Jun 1 '13 at 21:10
    
I'll go with this for now, but I'm open to fancy abbreviations that refine it! –  Joe Corneli Jun 1 '13 at 22:19

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