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Somewhat prosaically, it was stated that the origin (or at least the coining practice likely used) of the word "sick" to mean "awesome", or "cool", or "astounding" ... itself used the word "cool", which by itself is hardly a positive absolute connotation.

In fact, "hot" would be the positive connotation. Hot chick, hot rod, hot dinner, hot venue.

Which lead me to wonder, of all the various "social adjectives", how many relatively negative ones have become so mainstream, that they're now positive?

Like "cool" Like "incredible" (without credibility, false, a farce) Like "amazing" (early 13c., amasian "stupefy, make crazy) Like "wicked" (late 13c., earlier wick (12c.)/wicca - wretched)

Couldn't find any useful lists online.

Bob

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You can certainly find many of these in Urban Dictionary territory. You may find this interesting too. –  Sam May 22 '13 at 23:10
    
The recent use of "sick" has puzzled me! I will try to find something specific about that, if I can. Also, I commend you on your endearing choice of user name. Goats are fascinating creatures; good for meat and (pasteurized) milk, vexatious pets and cute too! –  Feral Oink May 23 '13 at 1:53

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