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Would you say "wanna" when you want something? For example, "I wanna a new PC", instead of "I want a new PC"?

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Only if speaking informally. –  Tristan May 19 '13 at 17:25
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Only if speaking English. Want a new is pronounced /wanənu/ in English. –  John Lawler May 19 '13 at 17:28
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"I want a new" -> "I wanna new" not "I wanna a new" –  Mitch May 19 '13 at 17:56
    
Well, John Lawler, in some varieties of English. It's /wanənju/ round here. –  Colin Fine May 19 '13 at 17:59
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Ok, some lects palatalize. But /wanə/'s still the same. –  John Lawler May 19 '13 at 18:05
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1 Answer

The most common use of wanna is for want to. So, wanna can be used like this.

 I wanna be a doctor.

shown here

But, there are some of the cases, where wanna is used for want a, as below,

 I Wanna New Room.

referred here.

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I'm getting two messages here. "No don't use it" and "Here's how you use it". –  Mitch May 19 '13 at 17:45
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@Mitch Narendra is saying wanna = want to, not wanna = want a. –  KitFox May 19 '13 at 17:47
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@NarendraDroidWorm: the link is correct as far as it goes. Certainly the most common use of wanna is to represent want to; but it says nothing about other uses, and in fact it's usable whenever the actual pronunciation is the same, whatever the syntactic construction. Many syntactic idioms like /'hæftə/ or /'yustə/ have special pronunciations that mark them as one particular structure and not another. But pronunciation is the fact; spelling is just a standard representation. And eye dialect spelling is not even that. –  John Lawler May 19 '13 at 18:09
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I Wanna New Room, by Karen Kaufmann Orloff. –  Colin Fine May 19 '13 at 18:10
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I.e, to spell it out. There is no "Right" or "Wrong" about non-standard spelling; only about standard spelling. –  John Lawler May 19 '13 at 18:11
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