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I am writing in UK English and would like to confirm that we use utilise instead of utilize. I cannot seem to find a answer for this online.

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I'd think in British English we'd say use. –  Brian Hooper May 17 '13 at 20:15
    
@Brian Hooper I'm in the states, but the OED definition suggests that utilize is slightly different (though, my impression is that most of the time utilize is misused) utilize: to make or render useful; to convert to use, turn to account —Oxford English Dictionary –  batpigandme May 17 '13 at 20:42
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Collins lists both in their English edition, and only one in their American edition. This link might help you, too. –  J.R. May 17 '13 at 21:16
    
Look up ise ize using the search function. –  Edwin Ashworth May 17 '13 at 21:35
    
@batpigandme: I don't know where you get that "slightly different" impression from. Current OED (online, which I can access, but can't link to) doesn't even have an entry for utilise. The only reference to the s-spelling I can see is that under the main heading it says Forms: Also utilise. –  FumbleFingers May 17 '13 at 21:56
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

In most words containing the ending, both -ise and -ize are acceptable in British English. Oxford University Press (which publishes all the Oxford Dictionaries) is well known as preferring -ize, but most other British publishers and authorities prefer -ise.

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This is correct. Oxford press prefer -ize and Cambridge press prefer -ise. It is traditionally more British to use -ise, but as both are accepted, -ize is international and it often makes sense to conform rather than alienate, unless you want a particularly British aesthetic. –  Sam May 21 '13 at 23:04
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