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I know a Hindi proverb, but I would like to know translation of same in English.

How will we say in form of proverb/idiom

Not listening or paying attention to the words that come out of your mouth

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closed as not a real question by Brian Hooper, mplungjan, Andrew Leach, Kris, RegDwigнt May 15 '13 at 11:19

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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I'm afraid translation is off-topic. See the faq. –  Brian Hooper May 15 '13 at 7:24
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You may be able to stop this question being closed if you attempt a translation yourself and then ask for an equivalent idiomatic English proverb. Try Google Translate, for example. –  Andrew Leach May 15 '13 at 8:45
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Counterquestion: What does this proverb mean? –  Em1 May 15 '13 at 9:17
    
i have suggested the change..let me know if anybody need more explanation –  Ravindra Shekhawat May 15 '13 at 9:24
    
Seems already translated on the web I take negative flak in one ear and out the other, says Deepika Kumari –  mplungjan May 15 '13 at 9:31
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think that this dude is talking about idioms...

Idiom:

"Go in one ear and out the other"

Meaning: Without any influence or effect; unheeded:

Example:His mind was made up, so my arguments went in one ear and out the other.

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Thanks Ravindra –  Rasmi Ranjan Nayak May 15 '13 at 9:14
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