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One of my US users asked the following questions when she got information about my resignation from my manager.

What is this rumor I hear? What kind of mischief are you up to?

I am not sure whether she is asking what I did wrong or what others did wrong by taking the resignation decision.

Can somebody explain me the meaning of this sentence in this situation.

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She just wants to know what you are up to and why the resignation. Mischief here basically refers to any discreet plans you may have after leaving the current organisation and which may have prompted your resignation. –  Mohit May 14 '13 at 6:39
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How is this off topic? See the tags, folks. –  Kris May 14 '13 at 8:53
    
Thanks Mohit and Kris. I tried to explain the situation so that i can get the better answer. Anyway thanks again for answering my question. –  english beginner May 15 '13 at 5:45
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1 Answer

It sounds like a light-hearted inquiry. The jestful implication is that you're leaving to go stir up some kind of trouble. She's asking "What kind of trouble are you going to cause?" But I stress, this is a common, friendly, thing to say. Think of it as a farewell.

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