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What is the correct verb associated with the consumption of soup? I've come across both the version.

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closed as general reference by RegDwigнt May 13 '13 at 11:30

This question is too basic; it can be definitively and permanently answered by a single link to a standard internet reference source designed specifically to find that type of information.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Eat here is general and I believe more formal. –  lexeme May 13 '13 at 5:58
    
Funny discussion on the same topic –  lexeme May 13 '13 at 6:01
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Related: “I am drinking ice cream” vs. “I am eating ice cream”, whose answers actually explicitly mention soup. I'm not quite sure what the question here is in the first place. When you eat soup, then you eat it. When you drink it, then that's what you do. I hope I don't have to explain how drinking is different from eating. So this is very much like asking whether "drive a car" or "wash a car" is correct. –  RegDwigнt May 13 '13 at 11:25
    
Interesting - I thought it was only in Japanese that you drank a soup! –  Andrew Grimm May 13 '13 at 11:27
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2 Answers

In US English, either eat or drink could be used with soup. I hadn't noticed it before, but although you generally drink liquids, you eat with a spoon, so you would drink a cup of soup and eat a bowl of soup.

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I drink broth but eat soup. –  Bradd Szonye May 13 '13 at 6:54
    
... and carefully steer clear of bisque, chowder, consommé ...? –  Edwin Ashworth May 13 '13 at 8:33
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"having soup" would be more generalized. what do you say?

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Yep - most people chicken out. –  Edwin Ashworth May 13 '13 at 8:34
    
yup when you are confused then so its better to chicken out than to be embarrassed ;) –  Mitaksh Gupta May 13 '13 at 9:15
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