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The online dictionary has the following to say:

Indicate >> to point out, show...

Vindicate >> to clear from censure or doubt by means of demonstration...

"Showing" is a means of "demonstrating" so is it reasonable to believe that "vindicate" is a form of "indicate?"

The word "re-enter" is derived from the preposition "re" and the root word "enter." What preposition (if any) would be represented by the "v" in "vindicate"? If there is none, how would the "v" cause "vindicate" to be a form of "indicate."

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Looking in etymonline shows that vindication came from vim + dicere: to say by force. And indication came from in + dicere: to say upon. (And of course, diction came from dicere.) –  Peter Shor May 8 '13 at 16:16
    
@PeterShor: OK, you looked at the problem from a DIFFERENT angle, and came up with your conclusion. Very interesting. If you made your comment into an answer, I'd probably upvote it. –  Tom Au May 8 '13 at 16:19
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You can't tell how words are actually related by their meanings in dictionaries. Only etymologies can tell you the real history. –  John Lawler May 8 '13 at 16:30
    
@JohnLawler: My understanding is that etyonline is a DUAL purpose tool. Or is it? –  Tom Au May 8 '13 at 16:31
    
I have no idea; I rarely use it. You'd have to consult them. –  John Lawler May 8 '13 at 16:51
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up vote 5 down vote accepted

They are related in that they both came from the Latin word dicere, meaning "to say". Etymonline shows that vindication comes from vim + dicere, whose roots mean something like "to say with force". And indication comes from in + dicere, whose roots mean something like "to say upon". So the prefix for vindication is vim, not v- (and it technically is a word and not a prefix; vindication is a compound word, and not prefix + word).

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