Take the 2-minute tour ×
English Language & Usage Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

Consider a sentence of the following form:

X, and the Y which comes with it, is good.

Assume X and Y are nouns, and X is singular. Should "is" be replaced with "are"? Is there some other grammatical error I am missing?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Matt E. Эллен, Mysti, Chenmunka, terdon, Josh61 Mar 4 at 20:29

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It should be "are." The problem is with the commas, which should be left out. You may be thinking of a sentence like "X, as well as the Y which comes with it, is good." In that case only X is the subject, so it takes a singular verb.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.