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Consider a sentence of the following form:

X, and the Y which comes with it, is good.

Assume X and Y are nouns, and X is singular. Should "is" be replaced with "are"? Is there some other grammatical error I am missing?

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possible duplicate of Not only X but also Y are (is?) –  Andrew Leach May 3 '13 at 13:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It should be "are." The problem is with the commas, which should be left out. You may be thinking of a sentence like "X, as well as the Y which comes with it, is good." In that case only X is the subject, so it takes a singular verb.

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