Take the 2-minute tour ×
English Language & Usage Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Which statement is grammatically correct?

A: I am uninterested.

B: Me too./ So am I.


A: I am uninterested.

B: I am uninterested either./ Neither am I.

share|improve this question

closed as general reference by Kris, FumbleFingers, Kristina Lopez, MετάEd, JeffSahol May 2 '13 at 14:41

This question is too basic; it can be definitively and permanently answered by a single link to a standard internet reference source designed specifically to find that type of information.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Why do you think the first (positive) positive would not do? The problem is with the use of the negative word in the first sentence. The response would be with an assertive "So am I", not "Neither am I" –  Kris May 1 '13 at 13:29
    
People can hardly motivate themselves now, can they? Although the statement included "can" yet it is incorrect to say "can't they" as a tag question in this instance. positive-positive, I thought the un/in might play the same role of "hardly"... –  Bright Polyglot May 1 '13 at 13:45
    
Please never just ask “Which is correct?” It shows no effort on your part, and gives us nothing to go on. As the Help Center says in its “How to ask a good question” section: “Have you thoroughly searched for an answer before asking your question? Sharing your research helps everyone. Tell us what you found and why it didn’t meet your needs. This demonstrates that you’ve taken the time to try to help yourself, it saves us from reiterating obvious answers, and above all, it helps you get a more specific and relevant answer!” Thank you. –  tchrist Jul 4 at 2:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It’s the first group. “I am X” always takes a positive response. The un- part doesn’t change the verb into a negative.

share|improve this answer
1  
People can hardly motivate themselves now, can they? Although the statement included "can" yet it is incorrect to say "can't they" as a tag question in this instance. positive-positive, I thought the un/in might play the same role of "hardly"... –  Bright Polyglot May 1 '13 at 13:43
2  
It might, but it doesn't. Not interested has negative polarity; uninterested doesn't. –  Colin Fine May 1 '13 at 13:52

They are all equally grammatical.

But I think what you are asking about is whether uninterested is treated as a negative polarity word, and so attracts the negative polarity word neither in a reply.

The answer is that it is not so treated, so Me too or So am I is the idiomatic answer.

But there is no other meaning that can be ascribed to Me neither in that context, so it would be understood, but not usual. (Me either is not idiomatic for me in any context).

share|improve this answer
    
Rather than the pragmatics, the OP seems to be asking about pedantic grammar. Me neither would be scorned by strict grammarians, I suppose. –  Kris May 2 '13 at 6:25

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.