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Is the usage of the word clique correct in the following sentence?

Thus a clique was formed.

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I would say yes. If the idea was that a group of people with same interests or dress sense separated itself into a semi-formal group –  mplungjan Apr 24 '13 at 5:11
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@mplungjan Interesting. In BrE, clique is universally pejorative and only used by those who are outside it. The sentence is grammatical, but there is no way of knowing whether the word is correctly used. –  Andrew Leach Apr 24 '13 at 6:40
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Sure, I was not adding any judgement on the statement –  mplungjan Apr 24 '13 at 7:00
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It's hard to weigh in on this without any expounding on why you think this might be used incorrectly. I could put plenty of nouns in there without introducing a grammatical problem: thus a loaf was formed; thus an opinion was formed; thus a boat, thus a letter, thus a circle was formed. Why not clique? –  J.R. Apr 24 '13 at 9:37
    
This needs a lot more context to tell if it is the right choice of word. –  Mitch Apr 24 '13 at 19:17
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closed as not a real question by MετάEd, Mitch, aedia λ, tchrist, Kris Apr 25 '13 at 6:29

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1 Answer

The usage of the word is correct.

In response to Andrew Leach's comment (I can't comment on things here yet, sorry) I wouldn't say that clique is universally pejorative in BrE; certainly if I were talking about a clique of people I knew that I wasn't in it might have those undertones, but to me it's generally a fairly neutral word even in that context, and when used in a more distanced context (describing the social structure in some group a sociologist is studying say) it's completely neutral. I agree that it would be surprising to hear someone describe themselves as in a clique, but only because it would sound like they were studying their own group in a detached sort of way.

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