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I have a question about the use of the word to as a time proposition. Is to inclusive in the following sentence?

I worked at company X from April 2012 to April 2013.

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marked as duplicate by tchrist, Matt Эллен, Kristina Lopez, FumbleFingers, Mitch Apr 24 '13 at 19:10

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I read it as from April 1st to April 1st. Add the days or "end of " or "inclusive" –  mplungjan Apr 22 '13 at 13:00
    
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I would guess it means you stopped working there sometime after 12:01AM on April 1, but before (or at) 12:00PM on April 30. –  GEdgar Apr 22 '13 at 13:56

1 Answer 1

It's ambiguous.

Some may read it as including April 2013, others may not. I'd probably read it as inclusive.

American English uses the inclusive word through:

  • I worked at company X from April 2012 through April 2013.

For unambiguous British English, add extra wording:

  • I worked at company X from April 2012 to April 2013, inclusive.

  • I worked at company X from April 2012 through to April 2013.

  • I worked at company X from April 2012 up to and including April 2013.

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What about the to in "through to" ? –  mplungjan Apr 22 '13 at 13:35
    
@mplungjan: American uses "through". British uses "to" but it's ambiguous so "through to" is a British compromise that doesn't sound too weird and American. –  Hugo Apr 22 '13 at 13:44
    
From a British perspective, it's not really necessary to add those extra wordings. They come across as unnecessarily formal and long-winded. It would be much simpler and more natural as I worked at company X from April 2012 to April 2013 or I worked at company X from April 2012 until April 2013. –  Tristan Apr 22 '13 at 15:20

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