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I need a bit of guidance regarding the following sentence. Which of the three variants is grammatical?

  • Are more people becoming increasingly intolerant?
  • Are more people increasingly becoming intolerant?
  • Are people increasingly becoming more intolerant?
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@BraddSzonye I would have certainly used a more toned down example but it's just that a certain horrendous incident happened yesterday with a 5 year old child and this particular sentence came up in my mind. I am sorry but I couldn't help –  Amit Pattnaik Apr 20 '13 at 10:37
    
Yeah, I now see 2 downvotes :D But never mind, like you said, I have now changed the questions accordingly. –  Amit Pattnaik Apr 20 '13 at 11:04
    
@BraddSzonye All thanks to you, the concept is now absolutely clear. Thank you once again :)) –  Amit Pattnaik Apr 20 '13 at 11:22
    
No need to thank me – that's what accepting and upvotes are for. Comments are for constructive criticism, not chat. I'll delete most of my comments here as they're no longer relevant. –  Bradd Szonye Apr 20 '13 at 11:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In the two examples, increasingly modifies different words:

  • Are more people becoming increasingly intolerant?
  • Are more people increasingly becoming intolerant?

The first example suggests both an increase in number and degree: more people and increasing intolerance. The second example suggests only an increase in number, but does so redundantly: more people and increasing occurrence. If you intend the latter meaning, a better wording would be, “Are more people becoming intolerant?”

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Thank you so much @Bradd Szonye. Your guidance is very much appreciated :)) Thank you once again. –  Amit Pattnaik Apr 20 '13 at 10:49

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