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Is there another way to say "We are working on to update our resort."? I do not want to use working on.

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If you let us know why you don't want to use "working on"--what sense it adds to or omits from what you want to say--we will be able to help you better. –  StoneyB Apr 12 '13 at 17:03
    
I prefer not to use it as it may imply that we are under construction works and may affect our business –  alxmb Apr 12 '13 at 17:12
    
So... what exactly /are/ you doing? –  karan.dodia Apr 12 '13 at 17:16
    
The example is ungrammatical (it should be ""We are working on updating our resort""). But as StoneyB says - why would you want to change the specific words "working on"? I suspect very likely "resort" isn't the right word here, but we can't say much unless you tell us what you actually mean. –  FumbleFingers Apr 12 '13 at 17:39
    
""We are working on updating our resort"" sounds good. I did not want to use "working on" in the sentense as we are responding to a question about our hotel and we dont want to make it sound as we are under construction works but only making some decor enhancements and furnitures updates –  alxmb Apr 12 '13 at 18:27

3 Answers 3

I would think any kind of phrase implying current updating, improvements, modernization, would be interpreted by travelers as "under construction", much like "cozy starter home" usually means cramped, 1-bath converted garage or other too-small structure. :-)

If you want to avoid the implication of being "under construction", you can use a more ambiguous phrase such as:

"We're always striving to make our resort comfortable and modern!"

or

"Exciting new changes welcome you each time you visit our resort!"

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1  
Great! thank you very much! –  alxmb Apr 12 '13 at 18:36
    
These smack of typical, and therefore meaningless, marketing phrases to me I'm afraid. –  David Aldridge Apr 12 '13 at 18:52
    
@DavidAldridge, typical, yes, but not meaningless. You need to read the intent into it - both my examples are basically implying that there is change (read: construction or disruption) going on at our resort. –  Kristina Lopez Apr 12 '13 at 19:11

"Working on" is surely implied by "updating", unless you are updating the resort without doing any work.

"We are updating our resort" is direct and meaningful.

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"We are updating our resort" is exactly what the OP is trying to avoid per the comment, "I prefer not to use it as it may imply that we are under construction works and may affect our business." (Which is why I resorted to my veiled innuendos in my answer.) –  Kristina Lopez Apr 12 '13 at 19:10

Use "We are updating our resort." (Or "modernizing" or "greatly improving")

Rarely are people interested that you "are working" (even very hard) to do something. I suspect that was what bothered you about your phrase.

A common similar problem is seen in much advertising writing that says things like, "We strive to meet your needs."

You either meet needs or you don't. "Striving" implies you have a hard time doing it.

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