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I can't analyze the structure of relative clauses.

We are to look only to God, who as He wills makes angels "ministering spirits" to the heirs of salvation.

I guess

... who makes angels as "ministering spirits" to the heirs of salvation.

is plausible. If so, where "He" and "wills" comes from?

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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

"As He wills" is a parenthetical that describes how God makes angels "ministering spirits" to the heirs of salvation. You can rephrase it without "as He wills."

We are to look only to God, who makes angels "ministering spirits" to the heirs of salvation.

Will as a full or main verb (and not a modal verb) has different meanings:

  • To want or like
  • To use the power of your mind to do something or to make something happen
  • To intend or want something to happen
  • To formally give your property or possessions to somebody after you have died
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+1 Among them, to want or like is what is meant in the context. Will here may probably also be interpreted as to use the power of your mind to do something or to make something happen. –  Kris Apr 11 '13 at 6:59
    
Thanks to both of you :) –  Josiah_En Apr 11 '13 at 7:08
    
The meanings of inflected forms of will are still modal (deontic modal, to be precise), but when it's inflected, it is no longer a modal auxiliary verb. This is the sense of will when used in hypothetical clauses (If he will hand it in, I will correct it). –  John Lawler Apr 11 '13 at 15:52
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