Take the 2-minute tour ×
English Language & Usage Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Could anybody help me in rephrasing these sentences in a scientific way?

Both d1 and d2 perform well under sparse vegetation (LAI<1), for LAI larger than 1, d1 (with almost constant performances up to LAI =6 ) outperforms d2 (performances decreased quickly with increased LAI)

share|improve this question

closed as off topic by tchrist, Carlo_R., Jim, Matt Эллен, RegDwigнt Apr 7 '13 at 21:56

Questions on English Language & Usage Stack Exchange are expected to relate to English language and usage within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I think it would be better to rephrase them in a comprehensible way. You could do that by breaking this into two sentences, putting in the word "and" where needed, and using fewer parentheses. –  Peter Shor Apr 7 '13 at 14:17
    
Any ideas from your side pleas? –  Barry Apr 7 '13 at 14:18
    
LAI<1 implies sparse vegetation, and you've already defined it? Then "Both d1 and d2 perform well when LAI<1. d1 performance is nearly constant for LAI <= 6, while d2 performance declines rapidly with increasing LAI." –  Wayfaring Stranger Apr 7 '13 at 18:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Both d1 and d2 perform well under sparse vegetation where LAI<1.

Where LAI>1, d1 outperforms d2: d1 has almost constant performances up to LAI =6, whereas d2 performance decreases quickly with increased LAI.

You could substitute is less than or is greater than for < and > if preferred. I've stuck to the same terminology as I can't change that without know ing more about the nature of the experiment. I've also used a colon in the 2nd sentence to skirt the issue of whether d1 should be D1 to start a sentence!

share|improve this answer

Both d1 and d2 perform well with sparse vegetation (LAI < 1). For 1 < LAI < 6, d1 outperforms d2: d1 shows little change in performance up to LAI =6, whereas the performance of d2 decreases quickly with increased LAI.

I've tried to put the d1 at the end of the first line onto the second for reasons of style, and to leave a gap after the colon to avoid confusion with ratio style, but the autoformat thinks it's smart enough to decide for me.

share|improve this answer

With a left curly brace for the 3 last lines of the following block and the proper symbols, I'd say something like this:

let p(x) be the performance of x and LAI the coefficient of vegetation sparsity,
p(d1) ≈ p(d2) > 0   LAI < 1
p(d1) > p(d2)       1 < LAI < 6
p(d1) ≈ p(d2) ≈ 0   6 < LAI
share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.