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I am try to say that it's hard to determine something until you have done it. Is the sentence below correct?

It is pretty hard to quantify one’s feeling until having seen the show.

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While not your question, the plural 'feelings' is pretty much required in this sentence, imo. –  ijw Feb 1 '11 at 13:22
    
I would not think you would have ANY feelings to quantify until you had seen the show. –  mplungjan Feb 1 '11 at 13:27
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think a better sounding phrase would be

It’s pretty hard to quantify one’s feeling without having seen the show

But otherwise, yes, that is correct.

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Others here are correct that without is a better choice given the way the example is phrased. But if you really want to use until you can, provided you recast the sentence something like this:

It's pretty hard to quantify one's feelings until one has seen the show.

or

It's pretty hard to quantify one's feelings until one sees the show.

I'm not particularly fond of the use of the word "quantify" here, however. If it were up to me, I'd use another verb: perhaps assess or evaluate.

It's pretty hard to assess one's feelings until one sees the show.

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Use 'without' instead of 'until':

It's pretty hard to quantify one's feelings toward the show without having seen it.

You could also rearrange it a little:

Without having seen the show, it's pretty hard to quantify one's feelings towards it.

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"Until" requires a point of time, or an action that can be viewed as a point: "Until twelve o'clock"; "until she comes"; "until seeing him". It can be used with extended but definite periods, but then requires there to be a specific time within that period, so "Until this year" implies "Until some specific time during this year".

"Having seen the show" relates to a period of time of uncertain length, with no particular points within it, and so is incompatible with "until". It is associated with a specific time outside itself (in this case, before itself), so it would be fine with "after", for example: "after having seen the show".

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It is pretty hard to know one’s feeling until he/she has seen the show.

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This actually strikes me as exceptionally ungrammatical. –  RegDwigнt Oct 22 '13 at 10:36
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protected by RegDwigнt Oct 22 '13 at 10:36

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